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A Yellow coneflower

A Yellow coneflower

Yellow coneflower

via GIPHY

The yellow coneflower will bloom again One year has passed, after all these months of waiting; it is springtime soon . As days grow longer and warmer, my memories of love and hate are as mixed as the colors of the flowers.Yellow coneflower, Echinacea paradoxa, is native to limestone glades in the Ozarks in Missouri and Arkansas. Its paradox is that this is the only species in the “purple coneflower” genus that doesn’t have purple flowers – at least until the more brightly-colored E. purpurea hybrids were developed recently. E. paradoxa was a key contributor in breeding programs for those new coneflower cultivars such as the Meadowbrite™ series and others.E. paradoxa is sometimes confused with Ratibida pinnata (prairie coneflower, grayhead coneflower), which also sometimes has the common name of yellow coneflower but these are completely different plants.

Coneflower

via GIPHY

Use yellow coneflower individually in the border or as a mass planting. Because it has an open habit, it is best to plant this species in groups of 3 or more in the garden to increase the visual impact. Try combining it with bright red or purple bee balm (Monarda), Teucrium ‘Purple Tails’, or blue-flowering catmint (Nepeta). Plant in front of tall ornamental grasses, such as little bluestem (Schizacryium scoparium) or ‘Karl Foerster’ feather reed grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora).Echinacea (Coneflower) are famous for their brown or black center cones and purple daisy-like rays. Though a plethora of coneflowers are available in a wide variety of colors besides purple, they are hybrids. Echinacea paradoxa (Yellow Coneflower) is the only species in the genus that produces yellow flowers.These heat-tolerant plants do best in full sun, but they can also be grown in partial shade. But, be aware that yellow coneflowers located in partial shade might not bloom as well as those in full sun.

A garden location with at least six to eight hours of direct sunlight each day is best.Yellow coneflower seeds require a cold, moist stratification period in order to germinate. You can achieve this by either sowing seeds in the fall to allow this process to naturally occur over winter or by mixing the seeds with damp sand or vermiculite in a sealed plastic bag and placing the bag in the refrigerator for one to two months.Yellow coneflower is sometimes confused with Ratibida pinnata, commonly called grayhead coneflower or prairie coneflower. Both sport yellow rays and prickly cones, but a few key differences can help you distinguish one from the other. The cones on prairie coneflowers are much taller than those on yellow coneflowers. Prairie coneflowers also have pinnate leaves, while yellow coneflowers do not. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

 

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