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A Wild Larkspur

A Wild Larkspur

Wild Larkspur

via GIPHY

Wild Larkspur, the professional bird photographers of Vancouver Island, CanadaLatin Name/Common Name- Delphinium carolinianum is in the Buttercup family (Ranunculaceae). The word “delphinium” is derived from Greek, meaning dolphin. It refers to the bud, which has a dolphin-like shape. The word carolinianum means from Carolina. Of course, today this refers to the mid part of the United States. Dwarf Larkspur is a gorgeous native wildflower, with uniquely-shaped, deep-purple blooms. A shorter variety that's perfect for border edges or small-space gardens, Dwarf Larkspur comes into bloom in early to mid spring. Although it draws in a myriad of insects, this plant has a special relationship to both hummingbirds and queen bumblebees, who serve as its only two effective pollinators. (Delphinium tricorne)

Larkspur

via GIPHY

Further genetic analysis has shown that the two large subgenera Aconitum (Aconitum) and Aconitum (Lycoctonum) are the sister group to Aconitum gymnandrum, Delphinium (Delphinium), Delphinium (Delphinastrum), Consolida and Aconitella. To make Aconitum monophyletic, A. gymnandrum has now been reassigned to a new monotypic genus, Gymnaconitum. Finally, Consolida and Aconitella are synonymized with Delphinium. D. arthriscifolium is sister to all other species of Delphinium sensu stricto (so excluding Staphisagria). It should be placed in its own subgenus, but no proposal naming this subgenus has been made yet. The subgenera Delphinium (Delphinium) and Delphinium (Delphinastrum) are sister to the group consisting of the species of Consolida and Aconitella, which together make up the subgenus Delphinium (Consolida). Aconitella cannot be retained as a subgenus because A. barbata does not cluster with the remaining species previously assigned to that genus, without creating five further subgenera.

Jabbour, Florian; Renner, Susanne S. (March 2012). "A phylogeny of Delphinieae (Ranunculaceae) shows that Aconitum is nested within Delphinium and that Late Miocene transitions to long life cycles in the Himalayas and Southwest China coincide with bursts in diversification". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 62 (3): 928–942. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2011.12.005. PMID 22182994. Carolina larkspur (Delphinium carolinianum subsp. carolinianum) of the Buttercup (Ranunculaceae) family has irregular (bilaterally symmetrical) springtime flowers that are typically deep blue. The genus name is based on a Greek word for “dolphin”, in reference to the shape of flower buds (when viewed from the side). The specific epithet is a reference to one of the Carolinas, presumably the site of the type collection, i.e., the collected specimen upon which the species is based. In the U.S., the species Carolina larkspur occurs from New Mexico to North Dakota, east to Wisconsin, Kentucky, and South Carolina, and south to the Gulf Coast. The typic subspecies discussed here occurs from northeastern Texas and Louisiana, north to Iowa and Illinois, and across the Southeastern states. In Arkansas, it occurs throughout much of the state except for low lying areas of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain and West Gulf Coastal Plain. Habitat preference is sunny to partially sunny, dry-mesic to dry sandy or rocky woodlands, glades, prairies and roadsides on various substrates. The species is also known as blue larkspur and wild larkspur. (Source: anps.org)

 

 

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