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A This Blossom Has Been Added to the GenusYellow Solidago

A This Blossom Has Been Added to the GenusYellow Solidago

This Blossom Has Been Added to the GenusYellow Solidago

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Solidago juncea, or Early Goldenrod, is a herbaceous perennial wildflower in the Asteraceae family. It is easy to grow and low maintenance once established. It does well in average, dry to medium, well-drained soil in full sun and tolerates poor, dry soils including soil with high clay content. It is a forgiving plant and is often found along roadsides and rocky banks, or in open woods. Goldenrod is sometimes blamed for the pollen that causes hay fever, however, that pollen and its irritating symptoms are actually caused by ragweed (Ambrosia species), whose pollen is airborne when goldenrod is in flower. As the common name suggests, this is one of the earliest blooming goldenrods, beginning to bloom in July and continuing through August. It is an attractive, slender plant with a delicate appearance. To extend the bloom period, remove spent flower clusters. Early Goldenrod displays a large number of small, bright yellow flowers borne in dense, plume-like panicles on the ends of stiff, narrow-leaved stems that typically grow to 2 to 4 feet tall. The plant is hardy and can take over a small space. To manage growth, you should divide plant clumps every 2 years. Because the genus Solidago contains over 120 species with similar traits and flowers, this particular plant may be confused with one of its many cousins. Early Goldenrod is moderately deer resistant.

FLOWER

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As the common name suggests, this is one of the earliest blooming goldenrods, beginning to bloom in July and continuing through August. It is an attractive, slender plant with a delicate appearance. To extend the bloom period, remove spent flower clusters. Early Goldenrod displays a large number of small, bright yellow flowers borne in dense, plume-like panicles on the ends of stiff, narrow-leaved stems that typically grow to 2 to 4 feet tall. The plant is hardy and can take over a small space. To manage growth, you should divide plant clumps every 2 years. Because the genus Solidago contains over 120 species with similar traits and flowers, this particular plant may be confused with one of its many cousins. Early Goldenrod is moderately deer resistant. This plant supports Wavy-lined Emerald (Synchlora aerata) larvae. Early Goldenrod flowers attract butterflies, bees, and other pollinators. Songbirds eat the seeds. Solidago support the following specialized bees: Andrena (Callandrena s.l.) asteris, Andrena (Callandrena s.l.) braccata, Andrena (Cnemidandrena) hirticincta, Andrena (Cnemidandrena) nubecula, Andrena (Callandrena s.l.) simplex, Perdita (Perdita) octomaculata, Melissodes (Eumelissodes) fumosus, Colletes simulans, and Colletes solidaginis. Songbirds are attracted to the seeds.

Solidago species are perennials growing from woody caudices or rhizomes. Their stems range from decumbent (crawling) to ascending or erect, with a range of heights going from 5 cm (2.0 in) to over a meter. Most species are unbranched, but some do display branching in the upper part of the plant. Both leaves and stems vary from glabrous (hairless) to various forms of pubescence (strigose, strigillose, hispid, stipitate-glandular or villous). In some species, the basal leaves are shed before flowering. The leaf margins are most commonly entire, but often display heavier serration. Some leaves may display trinerved venation rather than the pinnate venation usual across AsteraceaeThe flower heads are usually of the radiate type (typical daisy flower heads with distinct ray and disc florets) but sometimes discoid (with only disc florets of mixed, sterile, male and types). Only ray florets are female, others are male, hermaphroditic or entire sterile. Head involucres are campanulate to cylindric or attenuate. Floret corollas are usually yellow, but white in the ray florets of a few species (such as Solidago bicolor); they are typically hairless. Heads usually include between 2 and 35 disc florets, but in some species this may go up to 60. Filaments are inserted closer to the base of the corolla than its middle. Numerous heads are usually grouped in complex compound inflorescences where heads are arranged in multiple racemes, panicles, corymbs, or secund arrays (with florets all on the same side). (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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