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A Symptoms of a brain tumor

A Symptoms of a brain tumor

Symptoms of a brain tumor

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If you experience any of the following symptoms, you may have a brain tumor, a benign tumor on the lining of the brain. However, a brain tumor may not produce any of these signs, and it may also go undetected for many years after it first begins to grow.A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the brain. The anatomy of the brain is very complex, with different parts responsible for different nervous system functions. Brain tumors can develop in any part of the brain or skull, including its protective lining, the underside of the brain (skull base), the brainstem, the sinuses and the nasal cavity, and many other areas. There are more than 120 different types of tumors that can develop in the brain, depending on what tissue they arise from. Benign brain tumors typically grow slowly, have distinct borders and rarely spread. Benign tumors can still be dangerous. They can damage and compress parts of the brain, causing severe dysfunction. Benign brain tumors located in a vital area of the brain can be life-threatening. Very rarely, a benign tumor can become malignant. Examples of typically benign tumors include meningioma, vestibular schwannoma and pituitary adenoma.

BRAIN

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If doctors cannot safely perform a biopsy (tissue sample collection and analysis), they will diagnose the brain tumor and plan the treatment based on other test results. If a biopsy was possible, doctors can use it to determine the tumor grade (how aggressive it is), as well as study the tumor tissue for any biomarkers that can help personalize the treatment approach. brain tumor, as individual circumstances play a big role. For example, some malignant tumors can be successfully controlled by radiation therapy. Others, because of their location, may be life-threatening even if they are benign. Doctors have to look at thousands of patients with similar characteristics to see a trend in how certain tumors progress and how different treatments affect them.

People with a brain tumor may experience the following symptoms or signs. A symptom is something that only the person experiencing it can identify and describe, such as fatigue, nausea, or pain. A sign is something that other people can identify and measure, such as a fever, rash, or an elevated pulse. Together, signs and symptoms can help describe a medical problem. Sometimes, people with a brain tumor do not have any of the signs and symptoms described below. Or, the cause of a symptom or sign may be a medical condition that is not a brain tumor. The symptoms you are experiencing are linked to the location of the tumor in your brain. As your tumor grows, it can press on surrounding tissue, affecting the function controlled by that part of the brain. If you are diagnosed with a brain tumor, make sure your provider helps you understand where it is located. This can help you prepare for and manage symptoms. Metastatic tumors to the brain affect nearly one in four patients with cancer, or an estimated 150,000 people a year. Up to 40 percent of people with lung cancer will develop metastatic brain tumors. In the past, the outcome for patients diagnosed with these tumors was very poor, with typical survival rates of just several weeks. More sophisticated diagnostic tools, in addition to innovative surgical and radiation approaches, have helped survival rates expand up to years; and also allowed for an improved quality of life for patients following diagnosis. (Source: www.aans.org)

 

 

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