FutureStarr

A Swamp Candles

A Swamp Candles

Swamp Candles

via GIPHY

Is your house ever damp and musty-smelling and you feel like you just can’t shake the swamp out of it? Give these candles a try.The origins of the plant's genus name (Lysimachia) are obscure. One theory is that the name is a reference to King Lysimachos of Thrace, who is said to have pacified a bull with a piece of loosestrife. Another theory is that the name derives from the word Lysis (meaning a release from) and mache (meaning strife). The species name (terrestris) means "growing on ground." What other flowers can be confused with Lysimachia terrestris? I am seeing something very similar but without the red lines on the petals, and without the red tinge at the base of the petals. Every other characteristic is the same. The one I'm seeing is spreading fast, and is growing in full shade at a rocky edge, under sugar maples. So I'm wondering if that is why it doesn't have the red coloring on the petals. I can send you photos.

Swamp

via GIPHY

Comments: This is one of the more attractive Lysimachia spp. because the flowers are more conspicuous and less likely to be hidden by foliage. Species in this genus are highly unusual because their flowers produce floral oil, rather than nectar. Swamp Candles (Lysimachia terrestris) can be distinguished from other native Lysimachia spp. by its showy racemes of flowers; usually the latter produce flowers from the axils of their leaves. A non-native species, Lysimachia punctata (Spotted Loosestrife), also produces showy racemes of flowers, but its leaves are usually whorled and more broad, while the petaloid lobes of its flowers are more broad and overlapping than those of Swamp Candles. Swamp Candles occasionally hybridizes with 2 other Lysimachia spp., producing plants with intermediate characteristics. These naturally occurring hybrids include Lysimachia � commixta (Lysimachia terrestris crossed with Lysimachia thyrsiflora) and Lysimachia � producta (Lysimachia terrestris crossed with Lysimachia quadrifolia). Other common names of Lysimachia terrestris include Earth Loosestrife and Swamp Yellow Loosestrife.

Names: Swamp Candles was formerly slotted into the Primrose family (Primulaceae), but the change to Myrsine is explained at the page bottom. The genus name, Lysimachia, is from the Greek for either king Lysimachus or from lysis meaning "a release from" and mache is for "strife". The legend is that Lysimachus, king of Sicily, was walking through a field. A bull chased him. He grabbed a loosestrife plant, waved it in front of the bull and it calmed the bull. In general then, both the common and the generic name refers to a supposed power to soothe animals or "loose" them of their "strife". See below for more. The species name terrestris simply means 'growing on ground'. All the alternate common names are fairly self-explanatory, only the normal name - Swamp Candles - referring to the tall yellow raceme, does not use the word' loosestrife' in the name. (Source: www.friendsofthewildflowergarden.org)

 

 

Related Articles