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A Steep Ramp

A Steep Ramp

Steep Ramp

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Hotel management software company Steep Ramp found that they needed to constantly reevaluate their marketing practices to keep up with clients’ evolving preferences. Here's what we learned from their Methods: Seventy-five children were randomly divided in a reliability group (n = 37, 17 boys and 20 girls; mean ± SD age = 13.86 ± 3.22 yr), which performed two SRTs within 2 wk, and a validity group (n = 38, 17 boys and 21 girls; mean ± SD age = 13.85 ± 3.20 yr), which performed both an SRT and a regular cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) with respiratory gas analysis within 2 wk. Peak work rate (WRpeak) was the main outcome of the SRT. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) was the main outcome of the CPET. Reliability was examined with the intraclass correlation coefficient and a Bland and Altman plot, whereas validity was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients and stepwise linear regression analysis.

STEEP

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The Steep Ramp Test (SRT), a feasible, reliable, and valid exercise test on a cycle ergometer, may be more appealing for use in children in daily clinical practice than the traditional cardiopulmonary exercise test because of its short duration, its resemblance to children's daily activity patterns, and the fact that it does not require respiratory gas analysis. Age-related centile charts for the absolute peak work rate (WRpeak) (top graphs) and peak work rate normalized for body mass (bottom graphs) in the Steep Ramp Test for boys and girls separately. Dotted lines represent the 50th centile (P50); dashed lines correspond to the 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th centiles (P10, P25, P75, and P90, respectively); and solid lines indicate the 3rd and 97th centiles (P3 and P97, respectively). Age-related centile charts for the absolute peak work rate (WRpeak) (top graphs) and peak work rate normalized for body mass (bottom graphs) in the Steep Ramp Test for boys and girls separately. Dotted lines represent the 50th centile (P50); dashed lines correspond to the 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th centiles (P10, P25, P75, and P90, respectively); and solid lines indicate the 3rd and 97th centiles (P3 and P97, respectively).

Body mass–related centile charts for the absolute peak work rate (WRpeak) (top graphs) and peak work rate normalized for body mass (bottom graphs) in the Steep Ramp Test for boys and girls separately. Dotted lines represent the 50th centile (P50); dashed lines correspond to the 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th centiles (P10, P25, P75, and P90, respectively); and solid lines indicate the 3rd and 97th centiles (P3 and P97, respectively).Since the duration of the load phase of the Steep Ramp Test (SRT) differed among the participants, it was difficult to provide standardized encouragement throughout the test for each participant. During the first part of the SRT performed in the present study, encouragements such as “You are doing great, come on” and “Keep on going, great work” were used. When it became clear that a participant was struggling during the test, the exercise physiologist said, “OK, keep pushing hard on the pedals; the work rate increases fast, and you should try to maintain a pedaling frequency of about 80 rpm.” When the pedaling frequency at peak exercise started to drop toward 60 rpm (end of test criterion), the exercise physiologist said, “Come on, this is the most important part of the test; try to perform one last sprint, give everything you have got.” (Source: academic.oup.com)

 

 

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