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A St John's Wort in Winter

A St John's Wort in Winter

St John's Wort in Winter

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Lupins are a beautiful flower that you will find in many British gardens. Lupins are a staple of British cottage gardens, famed for both their height and colour. Originally hailing from the Mediterranean they are a perennial that will greet you with a gorgeous display year after year. They produce a large flowering spike that is full of colour and each plant can have lots of these spikes leading to a fabulous display. They will begin to flower around may and can last well into June. The flowers do go to seed quite quickly but your lupin will continue to produce more and more new spikes. To get the best out of these spikes though it is essential to deadhead the old spikes to give the new ones chance top flourish. Also cutting your lupins back in autumn can help them the following spring. The seeds are edible but if not treated properly first they can be poisonous to animals and humans. Greenfly can be a common problem for lupins here in the UK.

Plant

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Thank you for your informative article. I recently bought a lupine at a garden shop in New England, and several days later another. The 2nd plant was in a marked down section, with yellowed, wilted leaves no flowers and broken stems in a disintegrating cardboard pot that was only partially keeping the root ball contained. I took a chance, hoping the flower would be the pretty deep purple of my first plant. The tight flower spike grew but remained tightly closed and white. Oh well, I thought, it was just a couple of dollars. It will be fine… I was pleased to see yesterday morning that the flower is indeed deep purple. I have them both in deep urns with morning and mid day sun. I thought it was my TLC, but know now they thrive in unattended locations. Thank you again for your website.This is a small, upright, mounded, deciduous shrub with attractive, flaking reddish-brown bark on mature stems and striking, linear to oblong blue green leaves. Midsummer to early autumn, this plant bears golden yellow flowers with striking, bushy center stamens. Reddish-brown fruit capsules ripen in September and persist well into the winter. St. John's wort excels in the Midwest.

Hi Stuart, you can cut it shorter, but I wouldn’t cut it off entirely. Cutting it shorter will lead to branching out. This will make the shrub denser, and secondary growth tends to have more blooms. Possibly you did an excellent job planting the shrub and it’s really having fun spreading out, so make sure you know what shape and space you want it to have later on and use that as a guide to prune anything that juts out.– if it’s in a pot and the drainage hole is plugged, then excess water won’t flow out and the soil stays soggy. This is overwatering, and leaves usually turn yellow and drop off before they turn brown. Repot in a pot that has a hole under it that drains well, and layer about 2 inches of gravel or clay pebbles. If it’s in the soil and symptoms are the same, maybe the soil doesn’t drain well enough. It would be best to try to delicately dig the plant out and add lots of drainage material under it like coconut coir, clay pebbles or gravel again, and the like. Another sure way to help is to raise the growing bed so excess water will always drain away. (Source: www.nature-and-garden.com)

 

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