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A Snow on the Mountain Weed

A Snow on the Mountain Weed

Snow on the Mountain Weed

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In Montana, the plant has been known to compete with grazing cattle for forage. In Ohio and Pennsylvania, it is considered a nuisance plant for similar reasons. Similar plants in Colorado may actually be poisonous and should not be eaten. In most of Canada, though, the plant is considered harmless, and is used to make tea that is supposed to relieve pain from colds and sore.I've been trying to pull out as much of the root as possible, but this has gotten harder every year, and it's already coming up all over—in between everything else, which makes it even harder to pull. It's out of control, and we're concerned that it will kill the plants we do want. Is there any easy-on-my back, non-chemical way to get rid of this weed that some people call ground cover?

Plant

via GIPHY

from my grandmother's garden; apparently it was once a popular bedding plant. It is just now emerging from the ground, and I'd really like to get a jump on it this spring. I have won small battles forking the ground and then sifting through the soil to get every piece of the white roots. My aunt, who also had this problem from the same source, swears she eradicated the pesky plant through diligent weeding— preventing the leaves from feeding the roots. I don't want to use Roundup because the plant is intermingled with a particularly wonderful border of nativeNow, this plant—like many so-called invasives—did get its start as a very popular, deliberately planted ground cover. Also known as goutweed (which would lead you to believe it's a folk medicine, but the name is actually a corruption of 'goatweed', as goats love to eat it) and Snow on the Mountain, it has attractive leaves and umbeliferous flowers, like those of Queen Anne's Lace. Those flowers are great attractors of

"Preventing goutweed from photosynthesizing in early spring (at the time of leaf-out) can control the plant by depleting its carbohydrate reserves. This can be accomplished by cutting all plants once they've fully leafed out with a mower, scythe, or weed-whacker, and then covering the area with plastic." Attacking the plants later in the season, after they have acquired substantial food reserves, is much less effective, they warn.Valued as much for its dramatically variegated foliage as for its long-lasting flowers, Euphorbia marginata (Snow On The Mountain) is a single-stemmed annual adorned with oval light green leaves, the upper leaves being striped or margined white, and sometimes even solid white. Tiny flowers, each with white, petal-like bracts, are borne in clusters atop the stems from midsummer to early fall. The overall effect is very eye-catching. Standing out during all its growing season, this remarkable plant is resilient to most pests and diseases, is deer and rabbit resistant and is easy to care for. Perfect for wildflower meadows or perennial borders. (Source: www.gardenia.net)

 

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