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A Silene

A Silene

Silene

via GIPHY

The Silene promotional model is devoted to presenting healthy, balanced and – above all – tasty bowls made with a wide and ecologically minded range of products, with a daily changing menu.The definition of the types of inflorescence in Silene is difficult but very important in the classification of the species. In the perennials the basic form of inflorescence is a 3-flowered cyme, with more or less equal pedicels, called dichasium (the lateral pedicels opposite). A compound dichasium is one in which the lateral branches in turn bear dichasia, so that a 5-7-many-flowered dicha shim is formed. A panicle is where the main axis terminates in a flower, the lateral branches (arising from main stern) bearing dichasia or 1-2-flowers. The solitary flower is considered to be derived from a dichasium by the suppression of its lateral branches. A monochasium is a derivative of the cyme in which the suppression of some branches results in a racemelike inflorescence.

Silene

via GIPHY

In this account, Lychnis, Melandrium, and Viscaria have been included in Silene, their previous recognition as distinct genera having resulted in a great deal of confusion in both nomenclature and taxonomy. I have not presented an infrageneric classification of Silene because existing systems either do not include those other genera (e.g., P. K. Chowdhuri 1957) or do not deal with most of our native North American taxa [e.g., W. Greuter (1995) and the molecular studies by Oxelman and coworkers (e.g., B. Oxelman et al. 1997, 2000]. The recent molecular study by J. G. Burleigh and T. P. Holtsford (2003) provides little support for existing morphologically based sectional classifications within Silene insofar as they relate to endemic North American taxa. However, it does indicate the distinctness of our arctic alpine species (S. involucrata—as S. furcata, and S. acaulis) that are circumpolar in their distribution.

Bocquet, G. 1969. Revisio Physolychnidum (Silene Sect. Physolychnis).... Lehre. Burleigh, J. G. and T. P. Holtsford. 2003. Molecular systematics of the eastern North American Silene (Caryophyllaceae): Evidence from nuclear ITS and chloroplast trnL intron sequences. Rhodora 105: 76-90. Hitchcock, C. L. and B. Maguire. 1947. A Revision of the North American Species of Silene. Seattle. [Univ. Wash. Publ. Biol. 13.] Kruckeberg, A. R. 1962. Intergeneric hybrids in the Lychnideae (Caryophyllaceae). Brittonia 14: 311-321. McNeill, J. 1978. Silene alba and S. dioica in North America and the generic delimitation of Lychnis, Melandrium and Silene (Caryophyllaceae). Canad. J. Bot. 56: 297-308. Oxelman, B. and M. Lidén. 1995. Generic boundaries in the tribe Sileneae (Caryophyllaceae) as inferred from nuclear rDNA sequences. Taxon 44: 525-542. Oxelman, B., M. Lidén, and D. Berglund. 1997. Chloroplast rps16 intron phylogeny of the tribe Sileneae (Caryophyllaceae). Pl. Syst. Evol. 206: 411-420. Oxelman, B., M. Lidén, R. K. Rabeler, and M. Popp. 2000. A revised generic classification of the tribe Sileneae (Caryophyllaceae). Nordic J. Bot. 20: 743-748. Williams, F. N. 1896b. A revision of the genus Silene Linn. J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 32: 1-196. (Source:www.efloras.org)

 

 

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