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A Scrophularia Lanceolata

A Scrophularia Lanceolata

Scrophularia Lanceolata

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Named for the arm that it shares with its close relative, the Lance-leafed Figwort, Scrophularia Lanceolata is a relative of the chickweed that is ubiquitous in most gardens and flower beds.Lance-leaved figwort is a rather large wildflower, attaining heights of two to six feet while sporting very small red-brown, yellow and green flowers. The Iroquois made much use of this plant, making it into poultices to treat sunburn, sunstroke and frostbite, as well has using infusions of the roots to aid women in recovering after childbirth. There is a gradual change in appearance of the leaves from the base (or near the base) of the plant to those from further up on the stem, with leaves progressively changing as one moves higher on the stem (often becoming shorter, or less toothed/lobed, and/or with shorter petioles).

PLANT

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A close inspection of the flowers is needed to tell Early Figwort from Late Figwort, though, as their common names suggest, their flowering times rarely overlap. Early Figwort blooms from May until July whereas Late Figwort blooms from July until October. Each can obtain heights of well over 5 feet and will readily reseed in the right conditions. Preference is for shade, but you will find it in open fields and ditches if there is dense vegetation surrounding the base of the plant.

Growing your own plants from seed is the most economical way to add natives to your home. Before you get started, one of the most important things to know about the seeds of wild plants is that many have built-in dormancy mechanisms that prevent the seed from germinating. In nature, this prevents a population of plants from germinating all at once, before killing frosts, or in times of drought. To propagate native plants, a gardener must break this dormancy before seed will grow.

We dig plants when they are dormant from our outdoor beds and ship them April-May and October. Some species go dormant in the summer and we can ship them July/August. We are among the few still employing this production method, which is labor intensive but plant-friendly. They arrive to you dormant, with little to no top-growth (bare-root), packed in peat moss. They should be planted as soon as possible. Unlike greenhouse-grown plants, bare-root plants can be planted during cold weather or anytime the soil is not frozen. A root photo is included with each species to illustrate the optimal depth and orientation. Planting instructions/care are also included with each order. 3-packs and trays of 32, 38, or 50 plants leave our Midwest greenhouses based on species readiness (being well-rooted for transit) and order date; Spring shipping is typically early May through June, and Fall shipping is mid-August through September. Potted 3-packs and trays of 38 plugs are started from seed in the winter so are typically 3-4 months old when they ship. Trays of 32/50 plugs are usually overwintered so are 1 year old. Plant tray cells are approximately 2” wide x 5” deep in the trays of 38 and 50, and 2.5" wide x 3.5" deep in the 3-packs and trays of 32; ideal for deep-rooted natives. Full-color tags and planting & care instructions are included with each order. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

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