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A Rudbeckia Prairie Gold

A Rudbeckia Prairie Gold

Rudbeckia Prairie Gold

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Just 10,000 wild flowers spring up each year on this little-known prairie just outside Edmonton, Canada. Their color, paired with the sense of intense wild that surrounds them, makes for a uniquely beautiful and worthwhile hike.We stock over 2500 varieties of plants, with the majority propagated on site, so stocks will be ready at different times during the year. Stock levels are kept fully updated on our website. If you are interested in a specific product, please sign up for an email notification, by clicking on the 'Notify me when back in stock' link, on the plant product page. We are a small, family nursery and are very busy, growing & picking plants, so unfortunately we are unable to hold orders until other plants are ready for sale.� Once you’ve placed your order online you will receive a confirmation email.� Your order will then be dealt with as quickly as possible by our experienced mail order team. During peak periods it can take up to 10 working days to receive your plants.� Once the team have selected your plants the status of your order will change to “processing”.� Finally - when your order has been carefully prepared and boxed and is ready to be collected by our courier - you will receive a dispatch email and can expect your plants to arrive the following day (for mainland England, Wales & Scottish Lowlands).

Plant

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Rudbeckia hirta is a variable species that provides a splash of color in the summer garden with its brightly-colored yellow, gold, and mahogany blooms. Native to the plains and prairies of the Midwest, R. hirta is now naturalized throughout most of the continental United States and southern Canada, occurring in open woods, prairies, fields, and roadsides. Plant breeders have developed numerous variations on the typical daisy flower. These cultivated strains (often called gloriosa daisies) generally have larger or more richly colored petals than the species. ‘Prairie Sun’ is an unusual selection of R. hirta bred in Germany, with a light green eye instead of the typical dark brown central disk flowers of the species. This special cultivar was unique and tough enough to be both a 2003 All-America Selections winner and a Fleuroselect Winner in Europe. ‘Prairie Sun’ has large flowers from mid-summer through fall. Butterflies and soldier beetles are common visitors to these flowers. The single flower heads are 5” in diameter, with gold ray flowers (petals) and a light green, button-like center. The petals are a rich golden-yellow-orange at the base and soften to lemon-yellow at the edge. This color pattern is very consistent, giving the plant a more formal look than some other R. hirta cultivars that have great variability in flower patterning and/or colors. The durable plants grow about 3 feet tall, providing color for many weeks. The flowers are borne on long, sturdy branching stems, making it an excellent, long-lasting cut flower. It blooms slightly later than the similar cultivar ‘Irish Eyes’ (also with a green center, but having smaller flowers with yellow petals). The center does turn brown as the seeds develop.

Like most Rudbeckias, ‘Prairie Sun’ grows best in full sun. It prefers moist, rich loam, but thrives in almost any soil and tolerates some drought once established. The plants thrive in hot and humid summers but also do well in cooler climates and stand up in heavy rains. These low-maintenance plants do not require staking. Space the plants at least a foot apart (up to 2 feet apart in warmer areas with a longer growing season) Deadhead spent flowers to encourage additional bloom but leave the flowerheads at the end of the season to reseed (or to be eaten by birds) and for winter interest. Use groupings of ‘Prairie Sun’ in annual or perennial beds, in mixed borders or cottage gardens for a bold focal point, or intersperse them for more subdued impact. Individual plants can be used in large containers – alone or in combination with other complimentary plants, such as coleus and petunias. The bicolored petals blend well with both pastels and hot colors. It contrasts nicely with purple flowers or foliage, and pulls together orange and yellow flowers. The plants also fit well in meadows, looking stunning in late summer when planted in masses or drifts. Mix them with ornamental grasses such as feather reed grass (Calamagrostis ‘Karl Foerster’) or switch grass (Panicum ‘Heavy Metal’ and other cultivars), and blazing star (Liatris spp.) for a more informal, prairie-inspired planting that will be at its peak in late summer, or mix with the more airy Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia) or blue mist spirea (Caryopteris) for a completely different look. They could even be set them out in rows to use just for cutting. (Source: hort.extension.wisc.edu)

 

 

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