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A Resume Second Name

A Resume Second Name

Resume Second Name

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At some point in your life, you might have had a second name. Maybe you changed your original name when you went to college, or perhaps you chose your second name because it denotes your occupation. But might it be time to re-think your second name?

Job

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In contrast, a CV is a fairly detailed overview of your life’s accomplishments, especially those most relevant to the realm of academia. As such, these documents have their greatest utility in the pursuit of a job in academia or research. Because academic researchers are often working on and completing many projects and teaching responsibilities simultaneously, it is wise to think of a CV as a living document that will need to be updated frequently. A typical CV for someone in the beginning stages of his or her graduate school career might only be two or three pages in length, while the number of pages of a more seasoned researcher’s CV may run into the double digits. In both CVs and resumes, information within sections is usually organized chronologically.

Name and Contact Information: contact information for your current institution or place of employment may work best, unless you do not want your colleagues to know that you are job-hunting. (Source: writingcenter.unc.edu)

Professional

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An eye-tracking heatmap created by TheLadders found that when recruiters check out your professional online profile, they spend 19% of the total time eyeing your picture, which means that not so much time is spent on your skills, specialties, or past work experiences. Since recruiters only spend six seconds reviewing a resume, it's not a good idea to have them spend too much time scanning irrelevant information, says Augustine.

"If you have a common name, consider including your middle initial on your resume and online professional profiles to differentiate yourself from the competition," she says. For example, decide if you're Mike Johnson, Michael Johnson, or Mike E. Johnson. Then use this name consistently, be it on LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook. (Source: www.businessinsider.com)

Employer

Get rid of those numbers and codes when you submit your resume. An employer might get the impression that the job is halfway down a long list of potential opportunities. A hiring manager who sees “resume-10” as part of your file name will wonder what resumes 1 through 9 looked like and whether you’re just applying for every job in town.

Once you've named and saved your resume and cover letter, follow the directions in the job posting for applying for the position. You may need to send your application materials as an attachment, upload them to a job site, or upload them directly to an employer's application portal. (Source: www.thebalancecareers.com)

 

 

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