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A Resume Examples With Associates Degree

A Resume Examples With Associates Degree

Resume Examples With Associates Degree

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Did you grow up going to the minor league games with your dad's buddies? Or maybe you can make lemonade out of lemons, as they say. How about a resume with an associate's degree? Resume publishing sites have made it easy, but it's still sometimes a tough question to ask yourself if you are looking at your resume with a degree in your field.

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If you’ve been in the workforce for several years, move your education section below your professional experience. Your interviewers will be more interested in what you’ve achieved in recent years rather than in your academic career. You can also remove more specific details of your education section like attendance dates and GPA if you’d like. The more you can create interest around your work experience, the better. If you have advanced degrees like your masters or PhD, include those in rank order of level (ex. PhD, Master’s, Bachelor’s, etc.). In this example, the candidate included two diplomas:

Whenever possible, follow up on resumes that you submit. Many employers using electronic resume-tracking systems automatically screen out applicants who don't meet the educational requirements. You will have a much better chance of convincing an employer that you are a strong candidate if you make a personal connection with a hiring manager. (Source: www.monster.com)

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To further help limit confusion, another great way to use abbreviations is to write out the degree title when it first appears, followed by its abbreviation in parentheses. For example, if you want to abbreviate an associate of applied business, the first time the degree title appears in your resume you could write: "associate of applied business (AAB)." Then use the abbreviation "AAB" in all other mentions of the degree throughout your resume.

Understanding the abbreviation's popularity is important because it can help you know whether you should include it in your resume. If an abbreviation is popular in your field or industry, there's a higher chance that employers will recognize and understand it. For example, if you're applying to an open physical therapy position, employers might be able to recognize the abbreviation "APT" for an associate in physical therapy more easily than the abbreviation "AIT" for an associate of industrial technology. (Source: www.indeed.com)

 

 

 

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