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A Pictures of Heliopsis

A Pictures of Heliopsis

Pictures of Heliopsis

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Heliopsis is a genus of perennial herbs with flowers like those of flowering plants. The genus used to be placed in the lily family Liliaceae; however, recent studies suggest that it belongs in the Asteraceae-Boraginaceae family.The easiest way to identify this plant is by the bracts: look for the alternating long and short bracts. Most references describe this plant as growing up to 5 feet tall but I've come across some closer to 6 feet tall, though that is uncommon. Smooth Oxeye is not a true sunflower. The ray flowers of true sunflowers are sterile, but are fertile in this plant. Smooth Oxeye has a long blooming period, with the first blooms appearing by mid-June and the last dying out around the end of September. It grows in dry prairie as well as moister soils at woodland or wetland edges; plants are more robust in moister conditions than dry. USDA lists 4 varieties of Heliopsis helianthoides, though only 2 are recognized by Flora of North America: var. helianthoides with smoother leaves found east of the Mississippi River, and var. scabra with rough-textured leaves found in the Midwest, including Minnesota, and west of the Mississippi.

Heliopsis

via GIPHY

False Sunflower (Heliopsis helianthoides) is not considered a true sunflower (Helianthus sp.) because both the ray and disk florets of its flowerheads can produce seeds. In contrast, only the disk florets of sunflowers can produce seeds. In contrast to both False Sunflower and true sunflowers, only the ray florets of Silphium spp. can produce seeds, while their disk florets are seedless. All of these species are relatively large and robust plants that produce showy flowerheads with yellow rays, and they prefer habitats that are at least partly sunny. False Sunflower resembles many sunflower species, particularly those that are found in and around woodlands. In addition to the difference in the fertility of their florets, False Sunflower can be distinguished by its more erect flowerheads, by the rather stout and blunt-tipped phyllaries on its flowerheads, and by the arrangement of its outer phyllaries in a single series. In contrast, most sunflower species have flowerheads that nod sideways, their phyllaries are either more slender (linear-lanceolate in shape) or they are triangular with acute tips, and they have several overlapping series of outer phyllaries.

Sun-loving, easy to grow, hardy, heat and drought tolerant, False Sunflowers (Heliopsis helianthoides) have plenty of qualities and appeal! Valuable additions to the landscape with their profusion of bright golden daisies (2-3 inches wide, 5-7 cm) on display for 6 to 8 weeks all summer until early fall, they also feature a lovely foliage that is pleasant to the eye. Use them to brighten up a sunny area of the garden or in a vase where they will last a couple of weeks! I have these in my yard. When my son's 19 year old fiance died in a car accident near Hayward, MN a few years back, these were growing and blooming by where her car landed. I like to think that she saw them in her last moment. I dug some up and planted them by the end of my driveway. They're my "Venae flowers." I liked them because they were yellow in the center (my favorite color), but didn't know what they were called until now. (Source:www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

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