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A Oklahoma Grass

A Oklahoma Grass

Oklahoma Grass

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Few things in life are simple, yet few things are worth the struggle, compared to the small joys of a happy few moments that come from every simple thing.Bermudagrass is an aggressive, warm-season turfgrass species that spreads rapidly by above-ground (stolons) and below-ground (rhizomes) stems. It is the best-adapted turfgrass for full-sun areas in Oklahoma due to its excellent heat and drought tolerance during the summer and its sufficient winter hardiness. Bermudagrass cultivars having a fine texture (relative measure of leaf-blade width) and a high turf density (number of leaves or stems per unit area) are best suited for areas such as athletic fields and golf courses. The coarser-textured, lower density, common-type cultivars are better suited for home lawns because they require lower amounts of maintenance (fertilizing, mowing, and dethatching). Cultivars of this type that can be established vegetatively or with seed are Arizona common, U-3, and Guymon. All other bermudagrass cultivars do not produce seed and must be vegetatively propagated with sprigs, plugs, or sod. (back to top)

Area

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Arizona common is a medium textured, seed propagated bermudagrass that rapidly produces a turf of medium density and quality. Ease of establishment by seed and relatively low maintenance requirements are its desirable features. Winter kill during the first winter of establishment is a serious liability. Therefore, seed this cultivar on or before May 1 in order to allow time for it to prepare itself for winter. Sod of common bermudagrass is also available. It produces a turf area with medium density and texture, with sufficient winter hardiness when vegetatively propagated two to three months prior to the first fall frost. (back to top)Proper soil and site preparation creates optimal conditions for turfgrass establishment and forms the foundation of the turfgrass area. Try to complete soil and site preparation just prior to planting. The seedbed surface should be smooth, without clods, and the soil should be moist but firm, properly fertilized, as well as loose and granular. Uniformity of site preparation is critical in obtaining a uniform turfgrass stand. A firm, weed-free seedbed with just enough loose surface soil for uniform depth of cover is essential. Such seedbeds aid in obtaining a uniform planting depth and improve seed-soil contact. Soil and site preparation is the same regardless of whether you choose to establish your lawn by seeding, or by sodding, plugging, or sprigging.

2. Obtain soil samples for a soil test to determine phosphorus and potassium levels and pH (pH of 7 is neutral, below is acid, and above is alkaline). These should be taken two months prior to your planting date in order to allow sufficient time for you to receive your fertilizer recommendations and purchase the appropriate materials. To soil test, take about 10 to 15 cores, of a consistent depth (3 to 4 inches), over the whole lawn area. Discard plant material, such as stems and leaves. Place all samples in a container and mix thoroughly. Remove a one-pint soil sample and take it to your county Extension office for soil-test analysis. Your county educator will write your fertilizer recommendations, based on your soil-test results. If applications of phosphorus, potassium, lime (to raise pH), or sulfur (to lower pH) are recommended, then incorporate these materials into the upper 4 to 6 inches of soil as discussed in number 9. You will also need to broadcast a “starter” fertilizer on the surface of the finished seedbed, as discussed in number 11. 7. Installation of subsurface drain tile and underground irrigation systems should be completed prior to final seedbed preparation. Drainage lines should be 6 to 18 inches deep, depending on the weight of anticipated traffic. Irrigation main lines should be placed below the frost line while lateral lines in ornamental beds should be 18 inches deep and lateral lines in turf areas should be 12 inches deep. (Source: turf.okstate.edu)

 

 

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