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A Odora

A Odora

Odora

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Founded on the simple premise of sharing beauty and wellness pieces without the use of heavily-photographed models, Odora is changing how beauty is found online. The company emphasizes class, creativity, and independent content, with plans to launch a print magazine in the near future.A breathtaking beauty, Alocasia odora (Night-Scented Lily) is a rhizomatous evergreen perennial which is terrific for bringing a lush look to gardens or containers. Resembling the ears of an elephant, lustrous, brilliant green, paddle-shaped leaves are borne on strong stems. Large, they can reach 2 ft. in length (60 cm) and 1 ft. in width (30 cm). They are arrow-shaped at their bases and stand upright, pointing skyward, unlike the leaves of Colocasia which droop and point toward the ground. The new leaves are almost lime green and glow nicely until they begin to age and are upstaged by younger leaves. Reminiscent of calla lily flowers, the blossoms consist of a pale peach spathe and spadix. They are wonderfully fragrant, most particularly at night, and bloom in late spring through summer. The seedpods, packed with shiny red berries, are unexpectedly bold. Excellent tender perennial as a focal or specimen plant. Thrives in heat and humidity.

PLANT

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Often grown for their dramatic foliage reminiscent of elephant ears, Colocasia and Alocasia are terrific tender perennials that provide a strong ornamental interest and quickly give a touch of the tropics in gardens or containers. Impossibly exotic, their architectural shapes make them perfect for planting as focal plants or massed to create a tropical effect. Easy to grow, they stand proud and bold provided some basic rules are respected.Alocasia odora C. Koch, a hermaphroditic understory clonal herb, showed endogenous heat production during its blooming sequence. The first heat production cycle was associated with the initiation of the female phase and the third or the fourth cycle was associated with the male phase. Two flower-breeding flies, Colocasiomyia alocasiae (Okada) and C. xenalocasiae (Okada) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), were attracted by the strong odor that emanated from A. odora . The flies carried pollen from other inflorescences thus affecting the reproductive success of the female phase of the hermaphroditic host. The flies stayed within the flowers, eating pollen during the subsequent male phase, then exited the inflorescence carrying pollen to other inflorescences, thus affecting reproductive success of the male phase. These flower-breeding flies increased the efficiency of the alternating reproductive tactics of the protogynous host plant. The special odor that emanated from the host during heat production may serve as an important stimulus for the two pollinator species to locate their host inflorescences.

This little Daphne just gives and gives. Fragrant, purple/mauve flower clusters bloom from spring thru fall once the plant is established. Leaves are evergreen and narrow, about 1-2” long. The plant is a nice little shrubby thing growing only to 12”x12”. It is the perfect addition to a rock garden or container. Adequate drainage in the soil is essential to survival, so allow for it and don't over-water.Pachycaul herbs, massive, to 2.5 m, evergreen, with slightly milky latex. Stem erect to decumbent, with short stolons terminating in tubercles arising from base. Leaves several to rather many together, clustered at tips of stems of larger plants; petiole up to 1.5 m, sheath membranous; leaf blade peltate, cordate-sagittate or cordate-ovate, up to 130 × 100 cm, basal margins undulate, apex shortly acuminate; primary lateral veins 9-12 on each side, interprimary veins forming well-defined interprimary collective veins. Inflorescences 2 or 3 together among leaf bases, subtended by membranous cataphylls; peduncle stout, ca. 35 cm, exceeding cataphylls at anthesis. Spathe 13-25 cm, constricted ca. 1/6 of way from base; proximal part green, ovoid; limb cowl-like at anthesis, later reflexed, then deliquescent, greenish white, broadly oblong-lanceolate, 10-30 × 4-8 cm, membranous. Spadix shorter than spathe, shortly stipitate; female zone 1-2 × ca. 1.5 cm; pistil pale green, ca. 3 mm in diam.; stigma sessile, weakly 3-lobed, lobes blunt, pale green; sterile zone equaling male zone, ivory, very slightly narrowed corresponding to spathe constriction; synandrodes rhombic-hexagonal, ca. 2.5 mm in diam.; male zone whitish, cylindric, 3-5 × ca. 2 cm; synandria rhombic-hexagonal, convex-topped due to cap-forming synconnective, ca. 1.5 mm in diam.; appendix white, narrowly conic, 3-5.5 × 1-2 cm, equaling ca. 1/3 length of spadix, markedly thicker than male zone at base, slowly tapering toward apex. Fruiting spathe ca. 6 cm. Fruit ripening scarlet, globose, ca. 1 cm in diam. (Source: www.efloras.org)

 

 

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