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A Ne Seeds

A Ne Seeds

Ne Seeds

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Fleshy seeds, like black walnut, wild plum, dogwood and baldcypress, should be cleaned before planting or storage. Leaving the fruit to soften for several days after collecting will speed the process. An effective but messy method is to soak the fruit in a bucket for a week, then separate the pulpy mess from the hard seeds and rinse several times. Taken from experience, this is work best done outdoors! A note: black walnut pulp has a tendency to stain clothes, hands, tools and anything else it contacts a yellowish brown color, so take care when processing walnuts. One of my favorite seed catalogs on the market today is Ne Seeds. There are a few other great pick your own flower and vegetable seed catalogs, but the owners of the company are amazing and their products are just bursting with so many different options.

PLANT

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Once seeds have been collected and sorted, they must be stored properly. Some may tolerate long-term storage, but others must be planted right away and not allowed to dry out. When in doubt, consider Mother Nature. If a tree drops its seeds in fall, the seed will likely need a cold, moist treatment (called "stratification") of three or four months in order to germinate; in other words, it mimics a normal winter spent in the leaf litter and soil beneath a tree. Seeds that drop from a tree in spring will probably germinate right away. If intuition fails, another great source for information on treatment of seeds from many species is Michael Dirr's "Manual of Woody Landscape Plants," available at many public libraries.Keep in mind that most plants transplant better when they are small and dormant. The more the roots are disturbed, the more "transplant shock" the tree will have. An obvious way to avoid this problem is to plant the seed in its final location – right in the ground. Many fine woodlots have been planted with nothing more than a dibbling stick (for making holes) and a sack of acorns (for making trees). Even if the goal is to plant just one tree, it's sure easier to dig a hole for an acorn than it is to dig a properly-sized hole for a balled-and-burlapped nursery tree!

Seed containing a patented trait can only be used to plant a single commercial crop from which seed cannot be saved and replanted. Examples of seed containing a patented trait include but are not limited to Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® soybeans, Roundup Ready 2 Xtend® soybeans, Genuity® Roundup Ready® spring canola, and Genuity® Roundup Ready® winter canola. Additional information and limitations on the use of these products are provided in the Monsanto Technology Stewardship Agreement and the Monsanto Technology Use Guide. U.S. patents for Monsanto technologies can be found at the following webpage: http://www.monsantotechnology.com Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence Through Stewardship® (ETS). Monsanto products are commercialized in accordance with ETS Product Launch Stewardship Guidance, and in compliance with Monsanto’s Policy for Commercialization of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. Only commercialized products have been approved for import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Certain products have been approved for import into key export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from this product can only be exported to, or used, processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for this product. Growers should refer to http://www.biotradestatus.com for any updated information on import country approvals. Excellence Through Stewardship® is a registered trademark of Biotechnology Industry Organization. (Source: legendseeds.net)

 

 

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