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A Maianthemum Racemosum for Sale

A Maianthemum Racemosum for Sale

Maianthemum Racemosum for Sale

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When we think of common, everyday plants, mint comes to mind. But there may be an even more uncommon, odorless, and beautiful plant that simply goes by “Maianthemum Racemosum”.We call this widely-distributed plant Solomon's Plume, but it is equally known as False Solomon's Seal or False Spikenard. A former latin name is Smilacina racemosa. It is most often found in moist, rich woodlands and woodland edges, but can tolerate full sun. Its blooms actually will grow larger with more light. A cluster of star-shaped white flowers appear mid-late Spring and are pollinated by small bees and beetles. Attractive red berries, sometimes striped brown or purple, will follow for fall interest in your garden, and food for some birds and small mammals who will help distribute the seed. Maianthemum racemosum (False Spikenard) is a great looking perennial in the garden with its graceful, slightly arching stems featuring narrow, ovate, pointed, mid-green leaves with strong parallel veins running up to the tip. Rich of a rose fragrance, plume-like clusters of small, white flowers appear in mid to late spring. They give way to showy, ruby red berries in late summer, often persisting into fall unless earlier consumed by wildlife. The foliage of this North American native turns a lovely yellow in fall. It resembles that of the true Solomon's seals (Polygonatum spp.), but the latter has pendulous, axillary, bell-like flowers.

Plant

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Growing your own plants from seed is the most economical way to add natives to your home. Before you get started, one of the most important things to know about the seeds of wild plants is that many have built-in dormancy mechanisms that prevent the seed from germinating. In nature, this prevents a population of plants from germinating all at once, before killing frosts, or in times of drought. To propagate native plants, a gardener must break this dormancy before seed will grow. We dig plants when they are dormant from our outdoor beds and ship them April-May and October. Some species go dormant in the summer and we can ship them July/August. We are among the few still employing this production method, which is labor intensive but plant-friendly. They arrive to you dormant, with little to no top-growth (bare-root), packed in peat moss. They should be planted as soon as possible. Unlike greenhouse-grown plants, bare-root plants can be planted during cold weather or anytime the soil is not frozen. A root photo is included with each species to illustrate the optimal depth and orientation. Planting instructions/care are also included with each order.

3-packs and trays of 32, 38, or 50 plants leave our Midwest greenhouses based on species readiness (being well-rooted for transit) and order date; Spring shipping is typically early May through June, and Fall shipping is mid-August through September. Potted 3-packs and trays of 38 plugs are started from seed in the winter so are typically 3-4 months old when they ship. Trays of 32/50 plugs are usually overwintered so are 1 year old. Plant tray cells are approximately 2” wide x 5” deep in the trays of 38 and 50, and 2.5" wide x 3.5" deep in the 3-packs and trays of 32; ideal for deep-rooted natives. Full-color tags and planting & care instructions are included with each order. POTTED PLANTS (Trays of 32/38/50 plugs and 3-packs) typically begin shipping early May and go into June; shipping time is heavily dependent on all the species in your order being well-rooted. If winter-spring greenhouse growing conditions are favorable and all species are well-rooted at once, then we ship by order date (first come, first serve). We are a Midwest greenhouse, and due to the challenges of getting all the species in the Mix & Match and Pre-Designed Garden Kits transit-ready at the same time, we typically can't ship before early May. Earlier shipment requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

 

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