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A Lockspur

A Lockspur

Lockspur

via GIPHY

Here’s a company with a solid marketing foundation and an interesting visual identity. Can you tell which logo I’m talking about? Good. Now, without looking, can you describe the company?With blooms coming in beautiful shades of sky to navy blue, it's easy to see why larkspur is planted year after year. Blue is a hard to find color in the flower world, and larkspur has it in spades. You can find these blooms in both single and double varieties. Some varieties feature numerous petals that create a pom-pom effect. Plants will bloom longer if you remove old blossoms. Larkspurs are extremely unfussy plants and grow easily from seed. In southern climates, you can sow seeds directly in the ground in the fall. As soon as the weather begin to warm up in early spring, they will happily sprout and begin their show. Because they are cool-season annuals, the plants will begin to brown and die in the humid summers of the South. In more northern climates, sow seeds in early spring. Plants can last longer into the summer in the North before the weather gets too warm.

Lockspur

via GIPHY

A very close relative of larkspur, delphinium looks almost identical in many aspects, but a few differences set these two plants apart. Delphinium tends to be a perennial species, whereas larkspur is an annual. Foliage of larkspur is finer textured than delphinium. When it comes to blooms, delphinium flowers are densely born on spikes while individual blossoms tend to be much larger than larkspur. With those few exceptions, general plant care and maintenance is basically the same. Tall larkspurs have a spurred blue flower, similar to that of garden delphinium. Broad leaves are divided into deep lobes. In contrast, wild geranium, which is often mistaken for larkspur, has shallow leaf lobes. Tall larkspur is a perennial that is found on hillsides and in meadows. It ranges in height from 1 to 2 meters. A hollow stem distinguishes larkspur from poisonous monkshood, which has a similar blue flower but with a hood.

Larkspur causes heavy cattle losses in western range states. Larkspur is highly palatable to cattle, and losses can be expected when cattle are allowed to graze larkspur-infested ranges, especially where the plant is abundant or grows in large, dense patches. Tall larkspurs increase in palatability as plants mature. Cattle consume larkspur most often after plants begin flowering; consumption increases into the pod stage. Rain, cold fog, or snow showers may lead to greatly increased consumption of larkspur. Losses rarely occur in sheep or horses, but if subjected to sudden physical activity after ingesting large amounts of larkspur, these animals may die. Plants are most toxic during early growth, but toxicity gradually declines over the growing season. However, toxin levels may increase in the flowers and pods even late in the season. The toxic substances are mixtures of several alkaloids. These alkaloids and their relative toxicity and concentrations vary between individual plants, at different locations and between larkspur species. The method of toxicity has been identified as neuro-muscular paralysis, leading to respiratory failure, bloat and often death. (Source: www.ars.usda.gov)

 

 

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