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A Indian Grass Pictures

A Indian Grass Pictures

Indian Grass Pictures

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Karey Mesiti’s Indian Grass Pictures began when she left her corporate job to follow her passion of becoming a photographer. In this episode of her story, Karey talks about the importance of following your dreams, starting with just one photo.Close up of Lopsided Indiangrass curvy seed stalk with flower remnants Lopsided Indiangrass (Sorghastrum secundum) seed heads in forest. Photo taken at Morningside Nature center in Gainesville, Florida. Nikon D7200 with Nikon 200mm macro lens indian grass stock pictures, royalty-free photos & imagesLopsided Indiangrass seed stalk changing from blooms to seed with flowers dropping Lopsided Indiangrass (Sorghastrum secundum) seed heads in forest. Photo taken at Morningside Nature center in Gainesville, Florida. Nikon D7200 with Nikon 200mm macro lens indian grass stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

PLANT

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Indian grass, (Sorghastrum nutans), also called yellow Indian grass, perennial grass of the family Poaceae, one of the important constituents of the North American tallgrass prairie. Indian grass is sometimes planted as an ornamental border grass and is a good forage plant for livestock. It is a close relative of Indian grass is a tall sod-forming plant. Its fibrous roots reach depths of down to 1.8 metres (6 feet). The upright clumping leaves are blue-green and fade to yellow-orange in the fall. The plant bears narrow, greatly branched flower clusters. Each yellow spikelet is fringed with white hairs, giving the plant a silver-and-gold appearance. It readily reseeds itself in a variety of soils and is well adapted to fire.

Beloved for its interesting seed heads, this is one of the most ornamental native grasses. Very adaptable, it thrives in sun or shade, while the bobbing flat seedheads add interest, giving the plant its nickname: “fish on a line.” (They do look like little fish!) Lime green in the summer, the seedheads mature to a golden bronze. In the wild, this grass is found in the moist soil of wooded areas and along streams. It grows well in full sun, too, but may need supplemental water in periods of drought. Very attractive in the winter with a dusting of snow. Cut off the seed heads in fall, however, if you want to prevent it from popping up everywhere. Big Bluestem is tall, attractive and adapts easily to any landscape. Spring foliage starts out blue-green, slowly turns green, and changes gradually to reddish bronze in the fall. Growing well in a range of soils – moist or dry – Big Blue can be a slow starter, but will eventually form large upright clumps. In late summer it dons the iconic ‘turkey foot’ seedheads. Big bluestem has an extensive root system that can reach down 10 feet or more. Plant it in an informal meadow with other natives to attract birds and butterfly larvae. (Source: nativeplantherald.prairienursery.com)

 

 

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