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A Impatiens Propagation

A Impatiens Propagation

Impatiens Propagation

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It Can’t Just Be An AcronymNew Guinea impatiens are the perfect flowers to choose for shaded areas of your landscaping. They will add an explosion of color in these areas from early summer to fall. One of the many wonderful things about new guinea impatiens is that they are very easy to care for and do not require a lot of maintenance. They will thrive as a potted plant and directly sown into the soil. However, they will not tolerate frost very well as they are very sensitive to any type of cold weather. Propagating new guinea impatiens is a good way to keep new flowers growing throughout the winter for spring sowing. There are a few different ways to propagate your new guinea impatiens. Cut the stem of the new guinea impatiens about 4 to 6 inches below the bloom. You can use regular scissors for this as the stem is not stiff or hard. It is quite soft and can even be broken by hand. The need for a clean cut is not necessary with your impatiens. Remove all the leaves on the bottom of the cutting and any buds or blooms. By doing so, you are helping the plant conserve its energy and put it towards making roots.

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They do root readily in water; however, though roots form readily and often seemingly more quickly on many plants propagated in water, the roots produced are quite different from those produced in a soil-like or highly aerated medium (perlite - vermiculite - seed starting mix, e.g.). Physiologically, you will find these roots to be much more brittle than normal roots due to a much higher % of aerenchyma (a tissue with a greater percentage of intercellular air spaces than normal parenchyma). If you want to eventually plant your rooted cuttings in soil, it is probably not best to root them in water because of the frequent difficulty in transplanting them to soil. The "water roots" often break during transplant & those that don't break are very poor at water absorption and often die. The effect is equivalent to starting the cutting process over again.

Hi Hayley! Thanks for reading my article. Yes, watering in the morning is much better for two main reasons. One, you prevent your grass and other plants from mold that can develop because water sits on the grass blades and other plants overnight and does not evaporate. In the morning is better is because any water dispensed will be used by the plant and any lying on the surface of the plants will evaporate during the day. The second main reason is one you already mentioned, drought. By watering in the morning, grass and other plants can get all the moisture they need absorbed into the root system, as well as the blades and the rest of the plant structure. By the time it warms up, and gets dry, the grass and plants will already be hydrated. Here is one other tip, prior to watering your grass, put on the lawn an empty tuna tin. Then water your grass. You know your grass has received enough water when the tuna tin is filled to the brim. Once it is, turn off the water. Great way to make sure you don't give too much water which can have the opposite affect of what you are trying to accomplish, hydrate the grass and you also conserve your water supply too. Take care! (Source: www.houzz.com)

 

 

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