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A Hyacinth Poisonous

A Hyacinth Poisonous

Hyacinth Poisonous

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The Dutch, or common hyacinth of house and garden culture (H. orientalis, native to southwest Asia) was so popular in the 18th century that over 2,000 cultivars were grown in the Netherlands, its chief commercial producer. This hyacinth has a single dense spike of fragrant flowers in shades of red, blue, white, orange, pink, violet or yellow. A form of the common hyacinth is the less hardy and smaller blue- or white-petalled Roman hyacinth of florists. These flowers need indirect sunlight and should be watered moderately.Both hyacinths and tulips belong to the Liliaceae family, and contain allergenic lactones or similar alkaloids. The toxic principle of these plants is very concentrated in the bulbs (versus the leaf or flower), and when ingested in large amounts, can result in severe clinical signs. Severe poisoning from hyacinth or tulip poisoning is often seen when dogs dig up freshly planted bulbs or having access to a large bag of them. When the plant parts or bulbs are chewed or ingested, it can result in tissue irritation to the mouth and esophagus. Typical signs include profuse drooling, vomiting, or even diarrhea, depending on the amount consumed. With large ingestions, more severe symptoms such as an increase in heart rate, changes in respiration, and difficulty breathing may be seen.

FLOWER

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The hyacinth is a gorgeous addition to any garden and returns with even more blooms every year with little to no care. Many people also keep them as potted plants indoors too, but it is extremely important that you keep it away from your dog and other pets. As a matter of fact, it can affect humans as well and you should always wear gloves when handling the bulb and flowers. Breathing in the dust from the hyacinth bulbs can also cause irritation to the lungs and trigger an asthma attack in some people. The symptoms of hyacinth poisoning depend on what part of the plant your dog eats and how much of it was consumed. It is usually dependent on whether it is the bulb or the flower that is consumed, how much your dog eats, and your dog’s general health. The symptoms are different depending on whether it is oral (ingestion), inhalation, or topical (skin) exposure. Some of the most common symptoms are:

Hyacinths are common bulbed plants that grow all over North America. Scientifically they are known as “Hyacinthus orientalis” and are a part of the Liliaceae plant family. Hyacinths are very popular due to their clusters of vividly colored blooms that appear in the early spring. These flowers grow on stalks in clusters and come in blues, purples, pinks, yellows and whites. The shape of the flower is often trumpet or bell-like, and they are very fragrant. The leaves are fleshy in appearance and often narrow shaped. Spring is in full swing, with summer fast approaching. This means that flowers are on every corner, freshly cut on most tables, and possibly blossoming in your own garden. If you’re partaking in this extravaganza, more flower power to you. Be aware, however, that if you’ve got a furry feline that is fairly curious (read: all of them), there are some plants and flowers that are toxic or at least potentially toxic to cats. We’ve listed 10 of them below so you know what you can buy for optimal cat wellness and what to leave for other, non-cat households. If you'd like a full list of plants that are poisonous or potentially poisonous to cats, please see this guide of toxic plants to cats put out by the ASPCA. (Source: www.prestigeanimalhospital.com)

 

 

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