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A How to Write Patent in Resume

A How to Write Patent in Resume

A How to Write Patent in Resume

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In order to increase their chances of obtaining a job, candidates are encouraged to include information about their patent experience on their resume. Without a patent, that applicant's pursuit of a job may be slower than it needs to be due to less evidence of the patent. In order to have a patent listed on their resume, candidates may gain experience through a summer internship or research under a scientist, and they must list a patent number and the date it was filed.

Patent

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A patent is a form of documentation that identifies you as the inventor of your creations, which may include a technology product or new medication, for example. It prohibits others from duplicating your designs without your consent or selling them for profits. You can secure a patent for your original product for a certain amount of time. For example, if the patent lasts 10 years, then the law protects the integrity of your invention for that period. Professionals may deem your design worthy of a patent when it can perform a task in a way similar products haven't already done.

Think about the role you're seeking to determine where to place your patents category. For instance, if the employer emphasizes candidates inventing new things, then it might be helpful to list your designs at the top of your resume to capture the reader's attention. If patents are not requirements for your job but can still impress the recruiter, then consider attaching them beneath your skills section to maintain the spotlight on your relevant qualifications. Use consistent formatting, including the size of the font and the typeface, to ensure the recruiter can skim the content of your resume easily. (Source:www.indeed.com)

Job

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If you have just the one patent, you shouldn't be listing it on its own at all: you should simply mention it while talking about the accomplishments of the job where you worked on that patent. How you write it depends on exactly how you contributed. If you worked on the solution but not the patent you'd use something like "did X, Y Z to arrive at patented Product P". If you were part of the patent process and that experience is both relevant and substantial you could use "did X and Y to successfully complete patent application for Product P" Your actual contributions to P would then be listed in other bullet points.

If you have multiple patents and they're valuable for your profile and relevant to the job you're applying for, which is not always the case, only then should you be listing them separately under an "Achievements / Awards / Whatever" section. But there's zero reason to list anyone else who worked on that patent unless you want to name-drop someone like Elon Musk. Your CV is a marketing document and one of the rules of marketing is to avoid mentioning the competition. Citation standards do not apply to resumes in the real world. (Source: workplace.stackexchange.com)

 

 

 

 

 

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