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A Anemone Hepatica

A Anemone Hepatica

Hepatica flowers produce pollen but no nectar. In North America, the flowers first attract Lasioglossum sweat bees and small carpenter bees looking in vain for nectar. Then when the stamens begin to release pollen, the bees return to collect and feed on pollen. Mining bees sometimes visit the flowers, but prefer flowers that produce both nectar and pollen.One of the most beautiful and popular flowers, the Hepatica is in a genus of its own. The following colorful flower is found in wet, swampy spots in mild areas of North America, Europe and Asia.

Hepatica

Noted for its tolerance of alkaline limestone-derived soils, Hepatica may grow in a wide range of conditions; it can be found either in deeply shaded deciduous (especially beech) woodland and scrub or grassland in full sun. Hepatica will also grow in both sandy and clay-rich substrates, being associated with limestone. Moist soil and winter snowfall are required; Hepatica is tolerant of winter snow cover, but less so of dry frost.Hepaticas are among the first flowers to bloom in the spring. Sharp-lobed Hepatica and Round-lobed Hepatica have gone through a couple of name changes, at one time Hepatica acutiloba and H. americana respectively, and more recently considered different varieties of the same species, Hepatica nobilis var. acuta and var. obtusa respectively. Now they are different species again, in the Anemone genus, and closely related to the European species Anemone hepatica. The easiest way to differentiate Sharp-lobed from Round-lobed is—you guessed it—the round or pointed tips on leaves.

The flowers are much the same and, while the tips of the bracts on Sharp-lobed may be more pointed than on Round-lobed, this can be subtle so is not necessarily a reliable distinction. Their ranges overlap significantly and may be found in the same habitat at the same time of year, though Round-lobed Hepatica may be found on drier sites in more acidic soils.hepatica, (genus Hepatica), also called liverleaf, any of about seven species of small herbaceous plants of the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae) that grow in shady wooded areas of the north temperate zone. The plants are stemless low perennials with three-lobed leaves that remain green over winter. The flowers are purplish, lavender, blue, pink, or white and bloom early in the spring before new leaves appear on the plant. Hepatica was once believed to have therapeutic value in the treatment of liver diseases. The common hepatica of eastern North America is (Source: www.britannica.com)

 

 

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