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12 20 As a Percentage: ORR

12 20 As a Percentage: ORR

12 20 As a Percentage

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To derive the number of digits in a number, 20% of the number is put on the left-hand side and the resulting number is divided by the total number of digits of the original number to yield the number of digits on the right-hand side. For example, 50% of 50000 is 25000, so the number of digits on the right-hand side is 2.

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This is all nice, but we usually do not use percents just by themselves. Mostly, we want to answer how big is one number in relation to another number?. To try to visualize it, imagine that we have something everyone likes, for example, a large packet of cookies (or donuts or chocolates, whatever you prefer 😉 - we will stick to cookies). Let's try to find an answer to the question of what is 40% of 20? It is 40 hundredths of 20, so if we divided 20 cookies into 100 even parts (good luck with that!), 40 of those parts would be 40% of 20 cookies. Let's do the math: : Let's go with something a bit harder and four times more delicious: 400 cookies! We're dividing them evenly, and every compartment gets four cookies. Cookies look smaller, but in our imagination, they are the same, just the drawer is much bigger! One percent of 400 is 4. How about 15 percent? It's 15 compartments times four cookies - 60 cookies. Our tummies start to ache a little, but it has never stopped us from eating more cookies!

Do you have problems with simplifying fractions? The best way to solve this is by finding the GCF (Greatest Common Factor) of the numerator and denominator and divide both of them by GCF. You might find our GCF and LCM calculator to be convenient here. It searches all the factors of both numbers and then shows the greatest common one. As the name suggests, it also estimates the LCM which stands for the Least Common Multiple. Although Ancient Romans used Roman numerals I, V, X, L, and so on, calculations were often performed in fractions that were divided by 100. It was equivalent to the computing of percentages that we know today. Computations with a denominator of 100 became more standard after the introduction of the decimal system. Many medieval arithmetic texts applied this method to describe finances, e.g., interest rates. However, the percent sign % we know today only became popular a little while ago, in the 20th century, after years of constant evolution. That gives you the annual interest, but you are going to pay it in monthly instalments. That means that each year’s payment has to be divided by 12 (in practice, your mortgage company will probably do it by day, so that it will alter slightly each month, but this should be close enough for budgeting purposes). (Source: www.skillsyouneed.com)

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CGPA Calculator X is What Percent of Y Calculator Y is P Percent of What Calculator What Percent of X is Y Calculator P Percent of What is Y Calculator P Percent of X is What Calculator Y out of What is P Percent Calculator What out of X is P Percent Calculator Y out of X is What Percent Calculator X plus P Percent is What Calculator X plus What Percent is Y Calculator What plus P Percent is Y Calculator X minus P Percent is What Calculator X minus What Percent is Y Calculator What minus P Percent is Y Calculator What is the percentage increase/decrease from x to y Percentage Change Calculator Percent to Decimal Calculator Decimal to Percent Calculator Percentage to Fraction Calculator X Plus What Percent is Y Calculator Winning Percentage Calculator Degree to Percent Grade Calculator Percentages are sometimes better at expressing various quantities than decimal fractions in chemistry or physics. For example, it is much convenient to say that percentage concentration of a specific substance is 15.7% than that there are 18.66 grams of substance in 118.66 grams of solution (like in an example in percentage concentration calculator). Another example is efficiency (or its special case - Carnot efficiency). Is it better to say that a car engine works with an efficiency of 20% or that it produces an energy output of 0.2 kWh from the input energy of 1 kWh? What do you think? We are sure that you're already well aware that knowing how to get a percentage of a number is a valuable ability.

Although Ancient Romans used Roman numerals I, V, X, L, and so on, calculations were often performed in fractions that were divided by 100. It was equivalent to the computing of percentages that we know today. Computations with a denominator of 100 became more standard after the introduction of the decimal system. Many medieval arithmetic texts applied this method to describe finances, e.g., interest rates. However, the percent sign % we know today only became popular a little while ago, in the 20th century, after years of constant evolution. When you are working in a role where you might deal frequently with taxes (for example in accountancy or the building trade), having a quick and easy way to calculate the tax in your head is very useful. In the UK, when VAT and CIS (Construction Industry Scheme) taxes are 20%, a handy mental maths hack is to work out 10% (move the decimal point one place to the left) and then double your answer to get 20%. (Source: www.skillsyouneed.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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