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Understanding Colorism - Amber Rose Opens Up About Her Personal Experience 

Understanding Colorism - Amber Rose Opens Up About Her Personal Experience 

  Rose has experienced her share of heartache as a mother, model and author. Most notably she recently parted ways with rapper Wiz Khalifa before dating several men throughout her life. Colorism refers to discrimination based on skin tone among members of the same race or ethnicity, even among people from the same nation or culture. Examples include protests against skin lighteners in India and beauty pageant contestants that select candidates with eurocentric facial features and body types; it can also manifest in how students of color are treated at school. The Roots of Colorism Colorism, an indirect form of discrimination that exists globally but doesn't appear on its face in business decisions to hire black employees, can still have devastating repercussions for dark-skinned individuals while benefiting those with lighter skin tones. While colorism might not have as obvious an impact as racist hiring practices would - for instance businesses turning away black applicants when hiring jobs - studies have proven otherwise: skin tone plays a huge part in who gets ahead and who falls behind. According to experts, colorism has its roots in slavery and colonization. It can be defined as "prejudicial and preferential treatment of same-race people based on the shade of their skin" - Alice Walker famously coined this term in 1982; similarly it can be observed within fashion where beauty standards tend to favor light-skinned models as desirable models. Preference for light-skinned individuals is learned, starting early on in childhood. Studies have demonstrated that children of all ages respond more favorably when cartoon characters with light skin are shown as beautiful or intelligent than ones with darker skin; conversely, children will typically judge darker-skinned cartoon characters as ugly or stupid compared to their lighter-skinned counterparts. Biases remain instilled throughout life through interactions with others. People of color who experience discrimination on account of their skin tone often feel powerless to combat it due to its hard nature to prove, no formal law protecting them against it and subtle forms of harassment in both private and public spaces. No matter its subtlety, depression can have devastating repercussions for its victims' health and well-being. It may lead to depression, poor mental health and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease - not to mention impacting educational or career advancement, relationships and personal wellbeing. The beauty and fashion industries' preferences for light-skinned people have an adverse effect on people of color worldwide, especially women of color. Their self-image may suffer, leading them less likely to seek opportunities in the field; and pitting women of color against each other creates tension among women that could erode global development goals such as gender equality or poverty reduction. Unconscious Bias Unconscious bias refers to prejudices and stereotyping that people are unaware of having. Unconscious bias may influence people's actions and thoughts, often with serious repercussions for individuals. Unconscious bias is determined by each individual's background and experiences and differs from deliberate prejudice. These biases can manifest themselves in various forms, from judging someone based on their looks or favoring certain features over others, to stereotyping their personality and even discrimination in the workplace. Unconscious biases may even cause unfair treatment of employees based on gender, age, skin color, religion and sexual orientation - these unconscious tendencies must also be dealt with promptly as otherwise they lead to discrimination against employees who fit that category. Reduce unconscious bias through diversity training and encouraging positive intergroup contact. Such training allows individuals to uncover their biases without confrontational methods, so they can learn how to prevent future decisions or candidate evaluations from reflecting them. Counter-stereotyping can also help fight unconscious bias by providing individuals with information that defies stereotypes about various groups - for instance showing men nursing can disprove the notion that only women make good nurses. Amber Rose recently made headlines when she exposed Alexander "AE" Edwards for cheating. The SlutWalk founder posted an Instagram story Wednesday accusing Edwards of engaging in sexual encounters with 12 different women since starting dating Rose, 37, last year. Rose shares two sons with Khalifa: 22-month old Slash Electric with former partner Wiz Khalifa and 8 year-old Sebastian Taylor who she shares custody with Edwards. Joe Budden and Akademiks used Rose's latest appearance on Complex's Everyday Struggle podcast as an opportunity to investigate infidelity allegations as well as her former relationship. At first, Rose refused to discuss any personal matters but eventually gave in after some prodding from Joe Budden and Akademiks. Rose stated when discussing the cheating scandal that she is doing her best not to let it affect her career. She stated that she no longer wishes for a reconciliation with Wiz and is now focused on developing her music career independently. At 37, the model already has several projects underway including working with Mannie Fresh on their album project Muva. Educating Children About Colorism Colorism can be difficult for students to discuss, particularly if they have never personally experienced its impacts. Yet it remains an essential lesson that will have long-term ramifications on their lives. There are various approaches you can take with this topic with your students including books, articles, videos, movies and classroom activities. At first, it is necessary to educate students on the differences between racism and colorism. Both forms of discrimination involve prejudice based on skin tone; then explore some ways this form of bias has negatively impacted society. Research in the United States indicates that those with darker complexions face disadvantages in many aspects of society, including lower wages and unemployment rates as well as longer prison sentences. They are often perceived to have lesser intelligence and worse mental and physical health outcomes compared to people with lighter skin tones despite racism being illegal here. Despite being legalized decades ago, racism still remains pervasive throughout many aspects of our society today. Bias against lighter skin tones is a complex issue, and while it is easy to place the blame for such discrimination solely on European colonialism, its roots likely predate any contact with Europe and are instilled into many Asian cultures even today. For instance, ruling classes typically favored individuals with lighter complexions than peasant classes who became tanned while laboring outdoors; hence their preference has become part of culture across Asian nations today. As a parent or teacher, you can help your students combat colorism by teaching them to appreciate themselves and making sure that they interact positively with people of different shades. Encourage open discussions among classmates regarding fair treatment for all people regardless of skin tone; this can open up conversations on how we can make our society more equitable for all. Taking Action People are familiar with the term "colorism," yet many don't recognize its scope or its enduring effect on daily life. Colorism affects all areas of our lives - employment opportunities, health care costs and access to education can all be affected; even physical harm may arise as a result of color bias. Therefore, it is imperative that individuals recognize its insidiousness and take measures to overcome it. Though its exact beginning remains difficult to pinpoint, colorism has its roots in colonialism and white supremacy. Additionally, its impact can also be seen during slavery and post-slavery periods when black people seeking freedom sought proximity with whiteness as an essential way of finding freedom and success; hence why light skin was preferred over dark in Africa, South America and Asia. Studies have linked a preference for light skin with higher prison sentences, smaller incomes, lower marriage rates and reduced educational opportunity among people of darker complexion. Unfortunately, this preference persists globally today - giving credence to suggestions that colorism may actually constitute institutionalized racism rather than simply being discriminatory towards African American communities. Therefore, it is crucial for children to learn about the origins of colorism and embrace diversity. This can be accomplished through creating social circles consisting of people of various hues who encourage each other to appreciate and accept one another's skin tones and hues. Furthermore, adults must model this behavior for children by speaking freely about how all hues are beautiful without passing judgment based on skin tone alone. As we conclude our discussion on understanding and combatting colorism, it's essential to recognize that while we have made strides towards understanding it and combatting it, the battle is far from over. Our children will likely grow up in societies in which prejudice against dark skin will continue. Thus we must continue educating ourselves about its roots while working to undo our own skin-tone biases so as to aid our children.

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