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Black eyed susan

Black eyed susan

Black eyed susan

This is black-eyed Susan flower at the Wildlife Refuge, Fort Indiantown Gap. It is very important that you need to protect plant to not have to relocate it in the future. You should replace weedy areas and crops that compete with wildflowers with native vegetation. Another method to conserve the species is through conservation of the habitat.

Susan

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Rudbeckia hirta, commonly called black-eyed Susan, is a North American flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to Eastern and Central North America and naturalized in the Western part of the continent as well as in China. It has now been found in all 10 Canadian Provinces and all 48 of the states in the contiguous United States.In 1912, the black-eyed Susan became the inspiration for the University of Southern Mississippi school colors (black and gold), suggested by Florence Burrow Pope, a member of the university's first graduating class. According to Pope: “On a trip home, I saw great masses of Black-Eyed Susans in the pine forests. I decided to encourage my senior class to gather Black-Eyed Susans to spell out the name of the class on sheets to be displayed during exercises on Class Day. I then suggested black and gold as class colors, and my suggestion was adopted."'Goldsturm' Black Eyed Susan brings a burst of showy color to the full-sun garden. Golden yellow, daisy-like petals surround nectar-rich, brown center 'buttons' set atop deep green foliage. Unbothered by most pests, poor soils, drought and humidity, 'Goldsturm' is easygoing and the perfect addition to flower arrangements and pollinator gardens. Deer resistant and long-lasting. (Rudbeckia fulgida.Bring the native beauty of the prairie to your garden beds with the dramatic Giant Black Eyed Susan. Low, gray-green foliage clusters send up tall stalks 4-6 feet tall topped with yellow coneflowers in early summer. Blooms are loved by finches and butterflies. A low-maintenance plant that excels in average and poor soils. Deer resistant. (Rudbeckia maxima) .Cherokee Sunset Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia) casts an autumn glow across the garden with large double and semi-double blooms burning in radiant yellow, orange, and copper hues. A dark mahogany center and chocolate brown eye accent the warm tones. Sturdy, upright stems and bright green foliage resist deer and rabbit browsing. An award-winning beauty for season-long color. Easy-to-grow self-seeding annual in cooler zones. (Rudbeckia hirta).Versatile, drought-tolerant and easy-to-grow, Black Eyed Susan adds a cheerful splash of color to the summer landscape. A native plant that attracts a variety of pollinators, Black Eyed Susan pairs beautifully with other prairie favorites like Purple Coneflower and Butterfly Weed. Its adapatable nature makes it a great choice for poor soils and tough conditions. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow. Biennial.

 

Gloriosa Daisy is a deer-resistant variety that adds rich, gorgeous color to the summer and fall garden. A perennial form of the native Black Eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisies grow to be 12-36” tall and tolerate partial shade. Giant, bi-color double flowers are extremely easy to grow and bloom reliably year after year. All of the seed we carry at American Meadows is non-GMO, neonicotinoid-free and guaranteed to grow.Black-eyed Susan vine is commonly grown in the Midwest as a season annual to provide color in a vertical setting. This plant, Thunbergia alata, is actually a tender evergreen perennial in the acanthus family (Acanthaceae) native from tropical East Africa to eastern South Africa that is hardy only in zone 9 and 10 (and is completely unrelated to Rudbeckia hirta, an herbaceous annual or short-lived perennial in the daisy family (Compositae) native to north America, also commonly called black-eyed Susan). Because it grows and flowers relatively quickly it is often used as an annual ornamental garden plant in cooler areas. It should be used with caution in frost-free areas as it has become invasive in many warm locations throughout the world. (Source: hort.extension.wisc.edu)

 

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