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Glynn Turman

Glynn Turman

Glynn Turman

Glynn Turma

Glynn Russell Turman (born January 31, 1947) is an American actor, writer, director, and producer. Turman is known for his roles as Lew Miles on the prime-time soap opera Peyton Place (1968–1969), high school student Leroy "Preach" Jackson in the 1975 coming-of-age film Cooley High, math professor and retired Army colonel Bradford Taylor on the NBC sitcom A Different World (1988–93), and Baltimore mayor Clarence Royce on the HBO drama series The Wire. He also portrayed Jeremiah Kaan on the Showtime series House of Lies. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

www.imdb.com)New York City-bred actor Glynn Russell Turman, born on January 31, 1947, who enjoyed his first taste of success as a young teenager, originating the role of "Travis Younger" on Broadway in Lorraine Hansberry's landmark play "A Raisin in the Sun" in 1959 opposite Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, Claudia McNeil and Diana Sands as his various family members. While he did not play the role when it transferred to film in 1961, he intensified his studies at Manhattan's renowned High School of Performing Arts. (Source:

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Glynn Turman: Movies, Tv, and Bio

New York City-bred actor Glynn Russell Turman, born on January 31, 1947, who enjoyed his first taste of success as a young teenager, originating the role of "Travis Younger" on Broadway in Lorraine Hansberry's landmark play "A Raisin in the Sun" in 1959 opposite Sidney Poitier, Ruby Dee, Claudia McNeil and Diana Sands as his various family members. While he did not play the role when it transferred to film in 1961, he intensified his studies at Manhattan's renowned High School of Performing Arts. Upon graduation, Glynn apprenticed in regional companies throughout the country including Tyrone Guthrie's Repertory Theatre in which he performed in late 60s productions of "Good Boys," "Harper's Ferry," "The Visit" and "The House of Atreus." He made his Los Angeles stage debut in Vinnette Carroll's "Slow Dance on the Killing Ground" and earned TV marks for appearances in "Daktari," "Julia," "Room 222," a featured part in the TV movie Carter's Army (1970), and a regular role on the prime-time soap opera Peyton Place (1964). An impressive 1974 performance in "The Wine Sellers" earned him a Los Angeles Critics Award nomination and a Dramalogue Award. The play was entitled "What The Wine Sellers Buy" when he played it earlier on Broadway. He won his first NAACP Image Award for his work in the play "Eyes of the American." A writer and stage director as well, Glynn received his second NAACP Image award for his directing of "Deadwood Dick" at the Inner City Cultural Center. He segued these directing talents to TV where he helmed several episodes of "The Parenthood," "Hanging with Mr. Cooper" and "The Wayans Bros," among others. He also directed during his seasons of steady employment on A Different World (1987), in which he played the role of Colonel Taylor for five seasons (1988-1993). The show's theme song was sung by his late ex-wife, legendary "Queen of Soul" artist Aretha Franklin. They divorced in 1984 after six years. Glynn began his film career in the 1970s with such "blaxploitation" flicks as Honky (1971), Five on the Black Hand Side (1973), Together Brothers (1974) and Thomasine & Bushrod (1974), then advanced to the cult classic Cooley High (1975), plus The River Niger (1976) and A Hero Ain't Nothin' But a Sandwich (1977). TV-movies included the prestigious Centennial (1978), Attica (1980) and Minstrel Man (1977), for which he won his third NAACP Image Award, Race to Freedom: The Underground Railroad (1994), Buffalo Soldiers (1997) and Freedom Song (2000). In the midst of these early movie roles, he was once considered to play "Han Solo" in the original "Star Wars" film. A regular fixture on the smaller screen, Glynn appeared in a host of guest appearances during this time included "The Mod Squad," "The Rookies," "The Blue Knight," "The Paper Chase," "The Greatest American Hero," "Fame," "T.J. Hooker," "Hail to the Chief," "The Redd Foxx Show," "Matlock," "Murder, She Wrote" and "Touched by an Angel." The actor has also participated in such mainstream, audience-favorite, adrenalin-packed movies as Gremlins (1984), Out of Bounds (1986), Deep Cover (1992), How Stella Got Her Groove Back (1998), Subterfuge (1996), Sahara (2005), Burlesque (2010), Super 8 (2011) and Bumblebee (2018) along with the more critically acclaimed films Kings of the Evening (2008), Race (2016) and Windows on the World (2019) have also come across his path. Adept at professional roles, Glynn has enjoyed recurring roles into the millennium on such TV series as The Wire (2002) (as a mayor); Episode #1.422 (as a judge); and Mr. Mercedes (2017) (as another judge). Glynn has returned from time to time to the theatre (2013, "Joe Turner's Come and Gone"). The father of four children from his first and present third marriages (between singer Franklin). (Source: www.amazon.com)

superstarsbio.com)Glynn Turman - Biography, Height & Life StoryEditorial Staff at Super Stars Bio is a team of experts writers, journalists, led by Mairaj Pirzada. Trusted by over 1 million readers & celebrity fans worldwide. (Source:

Rotten Tomatoes: Movies

Boasting a résumé that would earn him the envy of any ambitious character actor, Glynn Turman was nothing if not an experienced performer. As if a storied screen career and rich history on the stage weren't enough, Turman also earned acclaim for his talents as a director, both theatrically and in the television industry. Revered likewise for his roles on the soap opera "Peyton Place" (ABC 1964-69), the sitcom "A Different World" (NBC 1987-1993), and the drama series "The Wire" (HBO 2002-08), Turman's is a fame that not only transcends time, but genre. Glynn Russell Turman was born on January 31, 1947 in New York City, New York. He began his acting career in 1959 with a role in the original Broadway production of A Raisin in the Sun. He followed this turn with an appearance in a televised production of Black Monday in 1961, as part of the syndicated anthology series "Play of the Week" (NTA Film Network 1959-1961). Turman graduated from the High School of Performing Arts, located in Manhattan, and set anew to a life of stage and screen acting. He kicked off his television career with a substantial recurring role on the drama series "Peyton Place" (ABC 1964-69), on which he starred for 37 episodes as the character Lew Miles. Turman made his film debut with a minor part in the racially themed romantic drama "Honky" (1971), which he followed up with appearances on TV shows like "The Doris Day Show" (CBS 1968-1973) and "Hawaii Five-O" (CBS 1968-1980), as well as with roles in movies including "Five on the Black Hand Side" (1973), "Thomasine & Bushrod" (1974), "The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat" (1974), and "Together Brothers" (1974). Turman's first headlining role came with the coming-of-age dramedy "Cooley High" (1975), in which he played a high school student nicknamed Preach. Throughout the 1970s, Turman continued to explore stage productions, both as an actor and a director. He rounded out the decade with a role on the historical miniseries "Centennial" (NBC 1978-79). In 1978, Turman married musical superstar Aretha Franklin. The 1980s gave Turman a slew of one-off television roles, as well as parts in feature films including "Penitentiary II" (1982) and the popular horror comedy "Gremlins" (1984). In 1988, Turman began a four-season-long stint as Col. Brad Taylor on the family comedy series "A Different World" (NBC 1987-1993). In addition to his role on the series, Turman directed a number of its episodes, and went on to do the same for 1990s sitcoms including "The Parent Hood" (The WB 1995-99) and "The Wayans Bros." (The WB 1995-99). Returning to dramatic acting, Turman then amounted roles in "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" (1998), "Light It Up" (1999), and "Men of Honor" (2000). Turman achieved favor with a new generation thanks to a substantial role as Baltimore Mayor Clarence V. Royce on the critically revered drama series "The Wire" (HBO 2002-08). Alongside a subsequent recurring role on the drama program "In Treatment" (HBO 2008-2010), Turman accumulated work in high profile films like the musical "Burlesque" (2010) and the science-fiction film "Super 8" (2011). At the inception of the dramedy series "House of Lies" (Showtime 2012-), Turman took on the part of Jeremiah Kaan, disapproving father to series star Don Cheadle's character Marty. (Source: www.rottentomatoes.com)

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Who Is Glynn Turman?

Glynn Turman is an American actor, best known for playing pivotal roles in series such as ‘The Wire’ and ‘A Different World’ Apart from acting, he has also served as a director in many stage productions throughout his career. Born and raised in New York City, he is of Nigerian descent. He was interested in the prospect of becoming an actor ever since he was a kid. He began acting at the age of 12. His first appearance as an actor was in a ‘Broadway’ production in 1959. He made his on-screen debut at the age of 21, appearing in a small role in the soap opera titled ‘Peyton Place.’ After beginning his film career in the early 1970s, he appeared in some notable films such as ‘Together Brothers’ and ‘Cooley High.’ In the 1980s, he appeared playing key roles in films such as ‘Gremlins,’ ‘Penitentiary II,’ and ‘Out of Bounds.’ He was almost cast as the legendary character ‘Han Solo’ in the popular ‘Star Wars’ film franchise, but him being black came in the way of that happening. More recently, he was known for starring in key roles in series such as ‘The Wire’ and ‘House of Lies.’ His most recent appearances were in the series ‘Claws’ and the film ‘Windows on the World.’ (Source: www.thefamouspeople.com)

 

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