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A Suzanne Malveaux

A Suzanne Malveaux

Suzanne Malveaux:

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In the last year, Suzanne Malveaux moved from Chicago to Atlanta and then became a partner at 500 Startups.

Suzanne

Award-winning journalist Suzanne Malveaux serves as CNN's national correspondent, covering politics, national news, international events and culture. Previously, she co-anchored CNN's Around The World and co-anchored the network's Emmy-winning coverage of the revolution in Egypt and the network's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Arab Spring. Suzanne also covered the White House for more than 10 years as a White House correspondent--covering Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. In September 2011, Suzanne was embedded with U.S. troops in Afghanistan for the 10th anniversary of 9/11 where she led breaking news coverage of the Taliban's terrorist attack on the U.S. Embassy there. In October 2012, she traveled to South Africa, where she interviewed family of Nelson Mandela and covered Soweto 36 years out of the student uprising. Suzanne was recognized by Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism for covering one of the top 100 stories of the century, for her reporting on the 2008 Obama campaign. She has been recognized as one of America's Most Powerful Players under 40 by Black Enterprise, one of Ebony's Outstanding Women in Marketing and Communications, one of the The Root 100 most influential young African Americans by The Root.com, and 2009 Journalist of the Year by Essence Magazine. Suzanne earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She is personally dedicated to promoting awareness and research for ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and enjoys participating in marathons and triathlons. She is an honorary member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority and she holds four honorary bachelor degrees. Suzanne is a 2011 Henry Crown Fellow of the Aspen Institute and a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network.

Suzanne Malveaux is openly gay and has identified herself as a lesbian. She has been in a relationship with her partner MSNBC quick-witted political pundit Karine Jean-Pierre. There are rumors that Karine Jean-Pierre and Suzanne got married in a private wedding ceremony, however, they have not yet confirmed these rumors. The two journalists have been in a relationship for a while now and often accompany each other to various public events. Furthermore, the couple co-parents their adopted daughter Soleil. (Source: www.wiki.ng)

Year

Award-winning journalist Suzanne Malveaux serves as CNN's national correspondent, covering politics, national news, international events and culture. Previously, she co-anchored CNN's Around The World and co-anchored the network's Emmy-winning coverage of the revolution in Egypt and the network's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Arab Spring. Suzanne also covered the White House for more than 10 years as a White House correspondent--covering Presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. In September 2011, Suzanne was embedded with U.S. troops in Afghanistan for the 10th anniversary of 9/11 where she led breaking news coverage of the Taliban's terrorist attack on the U.S. Embassy there. In October 2012, she traveled to South Africa, where she interviewed family of Nelson Mandela and covered Soweto 36 years out of the student uprising. Suzanne was recognized by Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism for covering one of the top 100 stories of the century, for her reporting on the 2008 Obama campaign. She has been recognized as one of America's Most Powerful Players under 40 by Black Enterprise, one of Ebony's Outstanding Women in Marketing and Communications, one of the The Root 100 most influential young African Americans by The Root.com, and 2009 Journalist of the Year by Essence Magazine. Suzanne earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She is personally dedicated to promoting awareness and research for ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and enjoys participating in marathons and triathlons. She is an honorary member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority and she holds four honorary bachelor degrees. Suzanne is a 2011 Henry Crown Fellow of the Aspen Institute and a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network.

How/where are you celebrating your birthday and with whom? “If tradition holds, I’ll wake up to a ‘surprise’ breakfast in bed from my partner and our 6-year-old daughter, complete with flowers, balloons and cards. Since it’s the 6-year-old ‘cooking,’ breakfast will likely consist of coffee, blueberries and a previously boiled egg. I’m a twin, and for many years my twin sister and I celebrated our special day together, with a cocktail in hand, usually on a beach in the Caribbean. This year we’ll be Zooming through a touch-up filter, still raising a glass! Since this is my first birthday without my parents, I will go say ‘hello’ to them at their gravesite to thank them. That always lifts me.” (Source: www.politico.com)

Cover

MALVEAUX: I think there was a lot of vitriol against President Bush as well. I think the questions are different. There are more questions about who President Obama is. It’s one of the challenges he faced during the campaign is to tell people and talk about his family life, his home life because he wants people to understand he’s not what some people have painted him as. [He’s not] some sort of other person who they don’t know, or who they don’t understand. I think President Bush got a lot of the criticism about how he won the election; and whether or not people agreed with his policy in terms of going to war. Of course under President Clinton there was a lot of criticism over the whole Monica Lewinsky impeachment period. So in covering in all three there has been vitriol. I think there’s a different kind of criticism for each one of these leaders.

For nearly 10 years Suzanne Malveaux has worked for CNN's White House unit where she has covered President Clinton, President Bush and President Obama. It was 20 years ago when Malveaux began her career as a general assignments reporter for New England News in Boston. Now she is the first Black woman to anchor CNN Newsroom at its 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. time slot. Essence.com caught up with the trailblazer to find out about her new position and life as a journalist... Here's what you had to say: Wendy commented via Facebook: "I'm a CNN news junkie." Sandee wrote via Facebook: "I like CNN and I like to cross reference headlines with some of the British news Websites." (Source: www.essence.com)

 

 

 

 

 

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