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What Is 2 5 As a Percent:

What Is 2 5 As a Percent:

What Is 2 5 As a Percent

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2 5 as a percent is 50%. So, 60% as a percent is 1. 6.

Percent

Let's go with something a bit harder and four times more delicious: 400 cookies! We're dividing them evenly, and every compartment gets four cookies. Cookies look smaller, but in our imagination, they are the same, just the drawer is much bigger! One percent of 400 is 4. How about 15 percent? It's 15 compartments times four cookies - 60 cookies. Our tummies start to ache a little, but it has never stopped us from eating more cookies! So what is percentage good for? As we wrote earlier, a percentage is a way to express a ratio. Say you are taking a graded exam. If we told you that you got 123 points, it really would not tell you anything. 123 out of what? Now, if we told you that you got 82%, this figure is more understandable information. Even if we told you, you got 123 out of 150; it's harder to feel how well you did. A week earlier, there was another exam, and you scored 195 of 250, or 78%. While it's hard to compare 128 of 150 to 195 of 250, it's easy to tell that 82% score is better than 78%. Isn't the percent sign helpful? After all, it's the percentage that counts!

Although Ancient Romans used Roman numerals I, V, X, L, and so on, calculations were often performed in fractions that were divided by 100. It was equivalent to the computing of percentages that we know today. Computations with a denominator of 100 became more standard after the introduction of the decimal system. Many medieval arithmetic texts applied this method to describe finances, e.g., interest rates. However, the percent sign % we know today only became popular a little while ago, in the 20th century, after years of constant evolution. The term percent is often attributed to Latin per centum, which means by a hundred. Actually, it is wrong. We got the term from Italian per cento - for a hundred. The percent sign % evolved by the gradual contraction of those words over centuries. Eventually, cento has taken the shape of two circles separated by a horizontal line, from which the modern % symbol is derived. The history of mathematical symbols is sometimes astonishing. We encourage you to take a look at the origin of the square root symbol! Recently, the percent symbol is widely used in programming languages as an operator. Usually, it stands for the modulo operation. On the other hand, in experimental physics, the symbol % has a special meaning. It is used to express the relative error between the true value and the observed value found in a measurement. To know more about relative error you can check our percent error calculator. Percent or per cent? It depends on your diet. If you eat hamburgers for the majority of your meals, it is percent. If you prefer fish and chips, it is per cent. If you spray your fish-smelling chips with vinegar, then it is per cent, mate (as opposed to burger eaters' percent, dude). When it comes to percentage, both sides of the pond are in agreement: it should be a single word. Still confused? Americans say percent, British use per cent. Something tells us that American English is more popular nowadays, so this website uses a single-word form. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

Divide

As your maths skills develop, you can begin to see other ways of arriving at the same answer. The laptop example above is quite straightforward and with practise, you can use your mental maths skills to think about this problem in a different way to make it easier. In this case, you are trying to find 20%, so instead of finding 1% and then multiplying it by 20, you can find 10% and then simply double it. We know that 10% is the same as 1/10th and we can divide a number by 10 by moving the decimal place one place to left (removing a zero from 500). Therefore 10% of £500 is £50 and 20% is £100.A fraction is defined as a portion of a whole quantity. A fraction simply represents the number of parts of a certain number divide a whole number. A simple fraction is composed of two parts namely the numerator, which is the number at the top, and the denominator being the number at the bottom. The slash line usually separates the numerator and the denominator. Examples of fractions include: 2/5, 1/3, 4/9 etc.

Sometimes fractions can be written differently but have the same value. 1/3 is the same as 2/6. These are called equivalent fractions. The way to get equivalent fractions is the multiply or divide the top and bottom numbers by the same number. In general you want to divide down to the smallest numbers you can; this is called simplifying fractions.Although Ancient Romans used Roman numerals I, V, X, L, and so on, calculations were often performed in fractions that were divided by 100. It was equivalent to the computing of percentages that we know today. Computations with a denominator of 100 became more standard after the introduction of the decimal system. Many medieval arithmetic texts applied this method to describe finances, e.g., interest rates. However, the percent sign % we know today only became popular a little while ago, in the 20th century, after years of constant evolution. Do you have problems with simplifying fractions? The best way to solve this is by finding the GCF (Greatest Common Factor) of the numerator and denominator and divide both of them by GCF. You might find our GCF and LCM calculator to be convenient here. It searches all the factors of both numbers and then shows the greatest common one. As the name suggests, it also estimates the LCM which stands for the Least Common Multiple. (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

Decimal

We use percentages to make calculations easier. It is much simpler to work with parts of 100 than thirds, twelfths and so on, especially because quite a lot of fractions do not have an exact (non-recurring) decimal equivalent. Importantly, this also makes it much easier to make comparisons between percentages (which all effectively have the common denominator of 100) than it is between fractions with different denominators. This is partly why so many countries use a metric system of measurement and decimal currency.

As your maths skills develop, you can begin to see other ways of arriving at the same answer. The laptop example above is quite straightforward and with practise, you can use your mental maths skills to think about this problem in a different way to make it easier. In this case, you are trying to find 20%, so instead of finding 1% and then multiplying it by 20, you can find 10% and then simply double it. We know that 10% is the same as 1/10th and we can divide a number by 10 by moving the decimal place one place to left (removing a zero from 500). Therefore 10% of £500 is £50 and 20% is £100. (Source: www.skillsyouneed.com)

Result

Percentage increase and decrease are calculated by computing the difference between two values and comparing that difference to the initial value. Mathematically, this involves using the absolute value of the difference between two values, and dividing the result by the initial value, essentially calculating how much the initial value has changed. In this case it can be helpful if, instead of thinking of the division symbol ‘÷’ as meaning ‘divided by’, we can substitute the words ‘out of’. We use this often in the context of test results, for example 8/10 or ‘8 out of 10’ correct answers. So we calculate the ‘number of managers out of the whole staff’. When we use words to describe the calculation, it can help it to make more sense.

The percentage increase calculator above computes an increase or decrease of a specific percentage of the input number. It basically involves converting a percent into its decimal equivalent, and either subtracting (decrease) or adding (increase) the decimal equivalent from and to 1, respectively. Multiplying the original number by this value will result in either an increase or decrease of the number by the given percent. Refer to the example below for clarification. (Source: www.calculator.net)

 

 

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