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Tile Pattern Calculator Math

Tile Pattern Calculator Math

Tile Pattern Calculator Math

There are many things to consider when calculating the tile pattern of a room. This calculator visualizes this process to help you out. It will also calculate your room dimensions so you can measure your room and discover some of your options.

Measure

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First, to calculate how many tiles you need to cover a given area you need to know the dimensions of the area as well as the dimensions of a single tile. The tile dimensions should be provided by the manufacturer, while the area dimensions can be measured using a long measuring tape or known from the building plan. Knowing these, our online tile calculator can calculate the area size and the area of a single tile. - For round areas, stretch your tape measure through the center of the circle. The tape measure must start at one wall and run through the center of the area until you reach the other side. This total length through the center of your circle is called the diameter. Half of the space’s diameter from the center to each wall is called the radius, which is the number you’ll need in your calculations. (remember in middle school when you thought you’d never use the geometry homework? Now’s your chance!)

Let’s say you’re dealing with an L-shaped area. Break it down into smaller sections of squares or rectangles and label each one with a letter. Continue measuring the width and height of each section and then calculating the area for them as individual units as explained in Step 3. Finally, add them together for the total square footage. The more individual spaces you’re measuring to add together, the more overage you’ll want to add to ensure full coverage.Unlike tiles which are sold by the sheet or box, trim pieces and decorative accent are typically sold by the piece. To figure the quantity you need, first find the length of each trim piece in inches (i.e. a 6" long bullnose or an 8" pencil). Then measure the length (in inches) of any edge you’re going to use your trims. Then divide the length of the edge by the length of one tile trim. (Source: www.tileclub.com)

Wall

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Floor or wall tiles are typically installed with gaps between the tiles because the average tile may look quite similar to the next tile, but they are often not uniform in shape and size, and would not fit properly if installed without any gaps. These gaps are most commonly filled with grout, and as such, are often referred to as grout size, or grout lines. Grout is a form of concrete, and the gap between tiles can range from anywhere between one-sixteenth of an inch to half an inch in size. Different sized tiles, materials, and design needs all affect the size of the gaps. Although it is typically more difficult to have small gaps between tiles due to lack of a uniform shape and size, the use of rectified tiles (tiles that undergo additional processing to ensure that they are uniform) can allow for smaller spacing, though at an additional cost. For more uniformly cut tiles such as granite, smaller grout spacing can result in less visibility of grout lines between each tile. Figuring out how much tile you're going to need for your project can be difficult (especially for Do It Yourself home improvement fans). Whether you’re retiling your walls or floors, a large or small space, it’s important to have enough tiles on hand before you begin a tiling project. The last thing you want to do is realize part of the way into your tile job that you didn’t order enough! Accurate measurements are the best way to ensure your job is completed on time, and you receive tiles from the same lot to ensure the closest match.

- For round areas, stretch your tape measure through the center of the circle. The tape measure must start at one wall and run through the center of the area until you reach the other side. This total length through the center of your circle is called the diameter. Half of the space’s diameter from the center to each wall is called the radius, which is the number you’ll need in your calculations. (remember in middle school when you thought you’d never use the geometry homework? Now’s your chance!)- Measuring a Kitchen Backsplash – Kitchen walls are generally rectangular shaped but there are often windows, doors, appliances, and hood areas to be considered. First, calculate the area of the entire wall you plan to cover, then subtract the area of the window or other elements that are on the wall. It is easier when you divide your space into smaller sections – such as left of a range, right of a range, and so on. (Source: www.tileclub.com)

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