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Shower Square Footage Calculator

Shower Square Footage Calculator

Shower Square Footage Calculator

The Shower Square Footage Calculator is a relatively easy-to-use tool for calculating the total square footage of a shower in centimeters or square feet. It is an interactive tool that prompts the user for their desired shower dimensions.

Foot

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- Measuring a Shower – Showers can be divided into rectangular sections (which is the easy part), but if you have a niche or a bench, that’s a few extra measurements to keep track of. Separate each section by the tiles you plan to use, grouping by material to calculate the square footage needed for all surfaces. Don’t forget to include the depth of the sides of niches and windows too! If you plan to have border tiles, calculate them the same way you measured for trim above, by measuring the perimeter of the shower area and dividing the number by 12 to determine the total linear feet of border tiles needed for your design!

Start on one shower wall and use a measuring tape to measure the length as well as the width of the wall needing tile. Multiply the length and width together and divide by 144 to determine the square footage of that wall. Repeat for all other walls in the shower area. Add the square footage of all the walls together to get the total square footage of the shower area. Add an extra 10 percent to the number for waste and any future repairs. Multiply the total square footage by the number of tiles needed per square foot: 1 square foot uses one 12-by-12-inch tile or four 6-by-6-inch tiles. For a 50-square-foot area, you would need 50 tiles if using 12-by-12-inch tiles, but 200 tiles -- 4 times 50 -- if using 6-by-6-inch tiles. (Source: homeguides.sfgate.com)

Tile

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There are a number of different classifications of tiles, including ceramic, porcelain, glass, quarry, and stone. Ceramic and porcelain tiles are the most cost efficient, and come in a variety of different styles. Glass tiles, while not appropriate for flooring because they crack under pressure, are visually unique and interesting; they are most commonly used for kitchen and bathroom backsplashes. Quarry tiles have rough surfaces that are good for floors that require grip, and are commonly used outdoors and in restaurant kitchens. Stone tiles include marble and granite, which provide unique and natural stone patterns, textures, and colors that are difficult to achieve using ceramics. They also offer the illusion of blending into grout edges, giving off an overall uniform look.

Figuring out how much tile you're going to need for your project can be difficult (especially for Do It Yourself home improvement fans). Whether you’re retiling your walls or floors, a large or small space, it’s important to have enough tiles on hand before you begin a tiling project. The last thing you want to do is realize part of the way into your tile job that you didn’t order enough! Accurate measurements are the best way to ensure your job is completed on time, and you receive tiles from the same lot to ensure the closest match. (Source: www.tileclub.com)

 

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