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Scientific Calculation Calculator

Scientific Calculation Calculator

Scientific Calculation Calculator

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Scientific Calculation Calculator

Scientific

In scientific notation a large number is converted to an equivalent decimal number between 1 and 10, multiplied by 10 raised to some power. Very small numbers are converted to an equivalent decimal number between 1 and 10, multiplied by 10 raised to some negative power. In this example scientific notation calculation we're solving 1.225 × 10 E notation is also known as exponential notation. E notation is the same as scientific notation where a decimal number between 1 and 10 is multiplied by 10 raised to some power. In E notation the "times 10 raised to a power" is replaced with the letter e in either uppercase or lowercase. The number after the "e" indicates how many powers of 10. In this example calculation we're adding 1.225e5 and 3.655e3:

had some features later identified with scientific calculator designs. The HP-9100 series was built entirely from discrete transistor logic with no integrated circuits, and was one of the first uses of the CORDIC algorithm for trigonometric computation in a personal computing device, as well as the first calculator based on reverse Polish notation (RPN) entry. HP became closely identified with RPN calculators from then on, and even today some of their high-end calculators (particularly the long-lived HP-12C financial calculator and the HP-48 series of graphing calculators) still offer RPN as their default input mode due to having garnered a very large following. A variation on the above method is to break the calculation into two parts, and use the memory functions of the calculator to store the result of the first part. The calculator memory is particularly useful when you want to calculate the values of several expressions that have a common part. This common part need be entered only once and its value reused several times subsequently. For example, rewriting the formula for the volume of wood contained in a log as (Source: www.open.edu)

 

 

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