FutureStarr

Perches to Feet OR

Perches to Feet OR

Perches to Feet

Perches are a major problem in our parks and forests. They’re beautiful and they’re popular, but they destroy other wildlife and wildlife habitat. They’re also dangerous, which is why, in BC, the most popular bird on Facebook right now is the Peregrine Falcon.

Perch

And Be it Remembered, That the Iron Yard of our Lord the King, containeth three Feet and no more. And a Foot ought to contain Twelve Inches, by the right measure of this Yard measured; to wit, The Thirty-sixth Part of this Yard rightly measured maketh one Inch, neither more nor less. And Five Yards and a half make one Perch, that is Sixteen Feet and a half, measured by the aforesaid Iron Yard of our Lord the King.

The size of the perch (or rod) was constrained by its use in defining the acre, which was a work unit of land: as much as a team of oxen could plow in a day. The length of the acre (the furrow-long, or furlong) is as far as the team can plow without needing a breather. The width was the number of furrows that could be plowed before the oxen had to be put out to pasture for the day. At least as early as the 8áµ—Ê° century an acre was a piece of land 40 perches long by 4 perches wide. (Source: www.sizes.com)

Foot

Because acres are not all of one measure, for in some countries they measure by the perch of eighteen feet, and in some by the perch of twenty feet, and in some by the perch of twenty-two feet, and in some by the perch of twenty-four feet, know that the acre which is measured by the perch of eighteen feet makes an acre and a rood, and the sixteenth of a rood, of the perch of sixteen feet, and four acres make five acres and a quarter of a rood, and eight acres make ten acres and a half rood, and sixteen acres make twenty acres and a rood. And the acre which is measured by the perch of twenty feet makes one acre and a half and the quarter of a rood, and four acres make six acres and a rood, and eight acres make twelve acres and a half, and sixteen acres are twenty-five acres. And the acre which is measured by the perch of twenty-two feet makes one acre and a half, and a rood and a half and the sixteenth of a rood, and four acres make seven and a half and quarter of a rood, and eight acres make fifteen acres and a half rood, and sixteen acres make thirty acres and a rood. And the acre which is measured by the perch of twenty-four feet makes two acres and a rood, and four acres make nine acres.

Mr. Bennet of Glan yr Afon, Llanidloes, at the instance of Mr. Evan Powell, also of Llandiloes, was good enough to collect for me, in the year 1887, some information as to the land-measures of Montgomeryshire. In the prosecution of his inquiries he called upon Richard Rees of Llawr y Glyn, then eighty-two years of age, who many years ago used to do all the tori bettin, or sod-paring work, in that neighbourhood. When he told Richard Rees on what business he was come, the old man, first of all, got out of his wain-house his measuring stick, which he called “a quart rod”, and then described its length: “Pedair llathen a haner yn exact” (exactly four and a half yards), said he. Well, there is “the rod of Hywel Dda”, containing thirteen and a half square feet, or eighteen feet of nine inches. The old man finally took Mr. Bennett into the field, and measuring on the ground twenty times the length of the rod in one direction, and then, at right angles, eight times its length, said “Dyna i chwi stang o dir” (there's a stang of land for you). (Source: www.sizes.com)

 

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