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I in Calculator

I in Calculator

I in Calculator

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In this calculator I can work out the product of any combination of digits

Display

Calculators that use infix notation tend to incorporate a dot-matrix display to display the expression being entered, frequently accompanied by a seven-segment display for the result of the expression. Because the expression is not evaluated until it is fully entered, there is provision for editing the entered expression at any point prior to evaluation, as well as replaying entered expressions and their answers from memory.

Modern computer algebra systems, as well as many scientific and graphing calculators, allow for "pretty-printing", that is, entry of equations such that fractions, surds and integrals, etc. are displayed in the way they would normally be written. Such calculators are generally similar in appearance to those using infix notation, but feature a full dot-matrix display and templates for entering expressions, which are navigated using arrow keys on the calculator. The templates contain spaces for values or expressions to be entered, and empty values would typically result in a syntax error, making it more cumbersome to navigate than standard infix notation; standard infix notation is often an option on such calculators as well. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Scientific

Modern computer algebra systems, as well as many scientific and graphing calculators, allow for "pretty-printing", that is, entry of equations such that fractions, surds and integrals, etc. are displayed in the way they would normally be written. Such calculators are generally similar in appearance to those using infix notation, but feature a full dot-matrix display and templates for entering expressions, which are navigated using arrow keys on the calculator. The templates contain spaces for values or expressions to be entered, and empty values would typically result in a syntax error, making it more cumbersome to navigate than standard infix notation; standard infix notation is often an option on such calculators as well.

On a scientific calculator, to find the sine of 30° for example, you type in 30, then sin get 0.5. If you got a different answer, it probably means that your scientific calculator is not in degree mode. To put it in degree mode, look for a button that says DRG which stands for Degrees, Radians, and Gradients. If you push the DRG button several times, you will see that the mode in your view screen will change between degrees, radians, and gradients. Push the DRG button until you see degrees or DEG indicated in the view screen. Once you have degrees in the view screen, then type in 30 then SIN and you should get 0.5. (Source: www.wikihow.com)

 

 

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