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How to Find Miles Per Hour With Fractions

How to Find Miles Per Hour With Fractions

How to Find Miles Per Hour With Fractions

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Direct your students to this article for a fun way to use the decimal-to-fraction conversion chart.

Help

The principal of Central Middle School is thinking of adding pizza to the lunch menu on Mondays and Fridays but needs help deciding the costs per slice and what students think is important about the pizza. After the students' initial decision about the pizza the principal remembers that there is a delivery charge.The students must revisit their decision and do additional calculations to see if their original process still works.

The principal of Central Middle School is thinking of adding pizza to the lunch menu on Mondays and Fridays but needs help deciding the costs per slice and what students think is important about the pizza. After the students' initial decision about the pizza the principal remembers that there is a delivery charge.The students must revisit their decision and do additional calculations to see if their original process still works. (Source: www.cpalms.org)

Know

This section has four problems. They are of a very similar structure to the previous problems from the examples. If a class was very successful with the check for understanding questions, then I will let them work through these problems while I check in on students who I know were having difficulty. If a large portion of the class struggled with the check for understanding questions then we will go through these problems one at a time. I will set a time of about one minute per problem and walk the room while students are working. If I see that there are still a lot of errors, I will take the problem to the board. If a lot of students have the correct answer, I will have students move on to the next problem.

To make this point, and to tie the concept to a variety of fractions other than unit fractions, I will pull up the previous exit ticket. In both of these problems we end up scaling the rates up using the value of the denominator as these were unit fractions. I will then define the word reciprocal and have students determine if we used the reciprocal to solve the problems from the exit ticket. The answer should be clearly YES. The resource has a few examples of a reciprocal, but it may be helpful to provide a few more examples for students to quickly solve so they will see that the product of a number and its reciprocal equals 1. This is the key concept for today's lesson: we can scale a rate by the reciprocal of its 2nd term to find the unit rate. This makes sense as we know with rates we can divide and that dividing is equivalent to multiplying by the reciprocal. (Source: teaching.betterlesson.com)

 

 

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