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How to Find 70 Percent of a Number

How to Find 70 Percent of a Number

How to Find 70 Percent of a Number

On large-scale projects, accuracy is often more important than speed. That’s because accuracy means small, manageable increments towards an end goal, and it’s important for project managers (PMs) and anyone else involved with the project to understand exactly where they are at in their journey.

Percent

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This percentage calculator is a tool that lets you do a simple calculation: what percent of X is Y? The tool is pretty straightforward. All you need to do is fill in two fields, and the third one will be calculated for you automatically. This method will allow you to answer the question of how to find a percentage of two numbers. Furthermore, our percentage calculator also allows you to perform calculations in the opposite way, i.e., how to find a percentage of a number. Try entering various values into the different fields and see how quick and easy-to-use this handy tool is. Is only knowing how to get a percentage of a number is not enough for you? If you are looking for more extensive calculations, hit the advanced mode button under the calculator. This is all nice, but we usually do not use percents just by themselves. Mostly, we want to answer how big is one number in relation to another number?. To try to visualize it, imagine that we have something everyone likes, for example, a large packet of cookies (or donuts or chocolates, whatever you prefer 😉 - we will stick to cookies). Let's try to find an answer to the question of what is 40% of 20? It is 40 hundredths of 20, so if we divided 20 cookies into 100 even parts (good luck with that!), 40 of those parts would be 40% of 20 cookies. Let's do the calculus:

So what is percentage good for? As we wrote earlier, a percentage is a way to express a ratio. Say you are taking a graded exam. If we told you that you got 123 points, it really would not tell you anything. 123 out of what? Now, if we told you that you got 82%, this figure is more understandable information. Even if we told you, you got 123 out of 150; it's harder to feel how well you did. A week earlier, there was another exam, and you scored 195 of 250, or 78%. While it's hard to compare 128 of 150 to 195 of 250, it's easy to tell that 82% score is better than 78%. Isn't the percent sign helpful? After all, it's the percentage that counts! (Source: www.omnicalculator.com)

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Sometimes you have to pay close attention to calculus problems (and real-world problems) to figure out what information you want. If what you really want to know is an item's final sale price after the discount is taken, you can skip calculating the discount's dollar amount and go straight to figuring what's left after you remove the discount. Imagine that you've seen a blazer in the shop window that originally sold for $90, but now it's on sale for 30 percent off. \

To learn more than just percentages, take a look at the other calculus videos from tecmath on YouTube. You'll want to know how to multiply when you calculate percentages, and this instructor's videos will help teach you shortcuts to make multiplication quicker. There's also a subtraction video. I like this instructor—his voice is kind, and his math methods are magical! You'll love the time-saving tips for working with numbers that you'll learn here. So if the dress originally cost $80 and it's on sale for 25 percent off, you stand to save $20. It should be intuitively clear that this means you'll pay $60, but if you're calculating percentages for a math problem, you might need to explicitly show that [original price] − [discount in dollars] = [sale price]. Or: (Source: sciencing.com)

 

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