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How to Do Fractions on Computer Calculator OR

How to Do Fractions on Computer Calculator OR

How to Do Fractions on Computer Calculator

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This article will explain how to calculate fractions on a calculator so you can figure out what the answer key is. As you will see, it's quite straightforward.

Fraction

By default, scientific calculators, like regular ones, display fractions as decimals. So if you enter a simple fraction, such as 1/2, the display reads 0.5. Some – but not all – scientific calculators offer a feature that allows you to display fractions without making the conversion. Using this feature, you can enter a complex fraction and simplify it right on your calculator. Calculators with this feature also allow you to enter a number composed of an integer and a fraction, such as 1 1/4. If your calculator doesn't have this feature, you can use a workaround to manipulate fractions. Calculators that display fractions sometimes have a special mode, called Math mode, that you must first select before you can enter fractions. When the calculator is in Math mode, the word "math" appears at the top of the screen. Once you have selected this mode (if necessary), look for a button with two boxes, one black and one white, arranged on top of each other with a horizontal line between them. This is the fraction button. On some models, the button may show x/y or a b/c. Pressing this button enables the fraction feature.

By default, scientific calculators, like regular ones, display fractions as decimals. So if you enter a simple fraction, such as 1/2, the display reads 0.5. Some – but not all – scientific calculators offer a feature that allows you to display fractions without making the conversion. Using this feature, you can enter a complex fraction and simplify it right on your calculator. Calculators with this feature also allow you to enter a number composed of an integer and a fraction, such as 1 1/4. If your calculator doesn't have this feature, you can use a workaround to manipulate fractions. (Source: sciencing.com)

 

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