FutureStarr

How Do You Make a Fraction on a Calculator

How Do You Make a Fraction on a Calculator

How Do You Make a Fraction on a Calculator

You probably think it’s pretty straightforward, right? A number plus a decimal point equals a fraction. The decimal point separates the number from the fraction, which has the power of the number of the decimal place. Digits are closer together on the left than the right. And it’s not a decimal point, it’s a comma.

Calculator

via GIPHY

Below are multiple fraction calculators capable of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, simplification, and conversion between fractions and decimals. Fields above the solid black line represent the numerator, while fields below represent the denominator. (Source:

Learn to add, subtract, multiply and divide fractions. Reduce fractions to lowest terms, simplify, compare and order fractions. Convert fractions to decimals and percentages, work with mixed numbers and improper fractions and solve for X in fractions equations using CalculatorSoup (Source: www.calculatorsoup.com)

Scientific

via GIPHY

By default, scientific calculators, like regular ones, display fractions as decimals. So if you enter a simple fraction, such as 1/2, the display reads 0.5. Some – but not all – scientific calculators offer a feature that allows you to display fractions without making the conversion. Using this feature, you can enter a complex fraction and simplify it right on your calculator. Calculators with this feature also allow you to enter a number composed of an integer and a fraction, such as 1 1/4. If your calculator doesn't have this feature, you can use a workaround to manipulate fractions.

Your TI-84 Plus can draw graphs, calculate logarithms and exponents, crunch matrices and even do calculus. The bad news is that with this much power packed into one calculator, there simply isn't room for every function on the keyboard. Case in point, the TI-84 Plus lacks a straightforward single button for entering fractions or mixed numbers – but you can still get there by using a few extra keystrokes. Lisa studied mathematics at the University of Alaska, Anchorage, and spent several years tutoring high school and university students through scary -- but fun! -- math subjects like algebra and calculus. (Source: sciencing.com)

 

Related Articles