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Graph a line

Graph a line

Graph a line

Line graphs use data point "markers," which are connected by straight lines. These data points, connected by straight lines, aid in visualization. While line graphs are used across many different fields for different purposes, they are especially helpful when it is necessary to create a graphical depiction of changes in values over time. There are some limitations to line graphs. For example, line graphs often lose clarity when there are too many data points. It is also easy to manipulate them visually in order to achieve certain effects. For example, the apparent degree of change can be visually manipulated by adjusting the range of data points on the axes.

Line

Line graphs consist of two axes: x-axis (horizontal) and y-axis (vertical). Each axis represents a different data type, and the points at which they intersect is (0,0). The x-axis is the independent axis because its values are not dependent on anything measured. The y-axis is the dependent axis because its values depend on the x-axis's values.Each data point is plotted and connected by a line that visually shows the changes in the values over time. If the value of the stock increased daily, the line would slope upward and to the right. Conversely, if the price of the stock was steadily decreasing, then the line would slope downward and to the right.

This is the formal definition of a line graph: Given a graph (G), its line graph (L(G)) is a graph such that each vertex of L(G) represents an edge of G, and two vertices of L(G) are adjacent if their corresponding edges share a common endpoint in G. A line graph is the intersection graph of the edges of G, representing each edge by the set of its two endpoints. To graph the equation of a line written in slope-intercept (y=mx+b) form, start by plotting the y-intercept, which is the b value. The y-intercept is where the line will cross the y-axis, so count up or down on the y-axis the number of units indicated by the b value. From the y-intercept point, use the slope to find a second point. The numerator of the slope tells you how many units to move up or down from the intercept, and the denominator of the slope tells you how many units to move left or right in order to plot the second point. Connect the two points and draw arrows at either end to indicate that the line extends infinitely. (Source: www.brightstorm.com)

 

 

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