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Fraction for 1 6

Fraction for 1 6

Fraction for 1 6

I’m glad I’ve actually (finally) learned the term “Fraction for 1 6” at school. We got a group of us together to see if we could find some fractions, and ended up doing the whole “Fraction for 1 6” game. I’m not quite sure how the game works, but I just wanted to share it with you.

Fraction

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Unlike adding and subtracting integers such as 2 and 8, fractions require a common denominator to undergo these operations. One method for finding a common denominator involves multiplying the numerators and denominators of all of the fractions involved by the product of the denominators of each fraction. Multiplying all of the denominators ensures that the new denominator is certain to be a multiple of each individual denominator. The numerators also need to be multiplied by the appropriate factors to preserve the value of the fraction as a whole. This is arguably the simplest way to ensure that the fractions have a common denominator. However, in most cases, the solutions to these equations will not appear in simplified form (the provided calculator computes the simplification automatically). Below is an example using this method.

An alternative method for finding a common denominator is to determine the least common multiple (LCM) for the denominators, then add or subtract the numerators as one would an integer. Using the least common multiple can be more efficient and is more likely to result in a fraction in simplified form. In the example above, the denominators were 4, 6, and 2. The least common multiple is the first shared multiple of these three numbers. (Source: www.calculator.net)

Number

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This is called a mixed fraction. Thus, an improper fraction can be expressed as a mixed fraction, where quotient represents the whole number, remainder becomes the numerator and divisor is the denominator. A fraction, where the numerator is less than the denominator is called the proper fraction for example, \(\frac{2}{3}\), \(\frac{5}{7}\), \(\frac{3}{5}\) are proper fractionsnumerator 1 is called a unit fraction.

Two fractions are equivalent when they are both equal when written in lowest terms. The fraction 212 is equal to 16 when reduced to lowest terms. To find equivalent fractions, you just need to multiply the numerator and denominator of that reduced fraction (16) by the same natural number, ie, multiply by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... At a glance, equivalent fractions look different, but if you reduce then to the lowest terms you will get the same value showing that they are equivalent. If a given fraction is not reduced to lowest terms, you can find other equivalent fractions by dividing both numerator and denominator by the same number. (Source:coolconversion.com))

 

 

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