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Finding Fractions of Amounts Year 4

Finding Fractions of Amounts Year 4

Finding Fractions of Amounts Year 4

There is this math problem floating around about finding fractions of amounts year 4. I don’t own a textbook, but I can show you how to do it with some apples.

Year

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In Year 1, children also learn to find quarters of shapes or sets of objects. You can help your child with this by giving them various shapes (circle, rectangle and square) and asking them to divide them into quarters and then colour one quarter. Use mealtimes as an opportunity to practise recognising halves and quarters, too. Could you get them to divide a pizza or cake into quarters and then give one quarter to someone? Remember to point out that one quarter is 'one piece out of four' and is written like this: 1/4.

Children in Year 3 will need to work out how to find fractions of amounts, for example: 1/3 of 12, 1/4 of 16, etc. Again, using small objects as counters will really help them with this. If they need to find 1/5 of 15, get them to count out 15 objects. Explain that because they are finding 1/5, they need to divide the objects into five equal groups. You could draw 5 circles on a piece of paper to help them with this. Once they have done this, explain to them that each circle contains a fifth of 15 (3). Once they have got the hang of this, they will need to start using mental division for working out these kinds of questions (for example: 1/4 of 20 is the same as 20 ÷ 4, which equals 5). Children learn about equivalence in Years 3 and 4, understanding that 1/2 is the same as 3/6, or 8/10 is the same as 4/5. They start to learn about equivalence with the help of diagrams, but then need to move onto recognising equivalent fractions without having to see or draw a pictorial representation. You can help your child with equivalence by using a fraction wall (see above). You can ask your child questions such as: What fractions are the same as 1/4? By looking at the wall, they should be able to tell you that 2/8 and 4/16 are the same as 1/4.In Years 5 and 6, they will start to relate fractions to decimals and percentages. An empty hundred number square really helps with this. Ask your child to colour half the squares. Explain to them that they have coloured 1/2, but they have also coloured 50/100. We write this in decimal form as 0.5. Encourage them to colour 1/4 and explain that this is 25/100 or 0.25. You can then go onto explain to them that 25% is the same as one quarter, 50% is the same as one half and 75% is the same as three quarters. (Source: www.theschoolrun.com)

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Children learn about equivalence in Years 3 and 4, understanding that 1/2 is the same as 3/6, or 8/10 is the same as 4/5. They start to learn about equivalence with the help of diagrams, but then need to move onto recognising equivalent fractions without having to see or draw a pictorial representation. You can help your child with equivalence by using a fraction wall (see above). You can ask your child questions such as: What fractions are the same as 1/4? By looking at the wall, they should be able to tell you that 2/8 and 4/16 are the same as 1/4.In Year 1, children also learn to find quarters of shapes or sets of objects. You can help your child with this by giving them various shapes (circle, rectangle and square) and asking them to divide them into quarters and then colour one quarter. Use mealtimes as an opportunity to practise recognising halves and quarters, too. Could you get them to divide a pizza or cake into quarters and then give one quarter to someone? Remember to point out that one quarter is 'one piece out of four' and is written like this: 1/4.

Google Classroom resources! Ideal for distance learning!These digital fraction resources are in Google Slides and Google Forms format, making it compatible with Google Classroom. This resource is only intended for digital learning; there is no PDF document included. This bundle includes the followi.An early introduction to fractions - parts of a set that builds confidence and a strong understanding! Covers CCS, perfect for math centers, distance learning/e-learning, small group, targeted instruction but could also be used as whole-group instruction as well. No-prep. Assessment included. Google (Source: www.teacherspayteachers.com)

Resource

A superb way for finding fractions of amounts including fractions of measures: cm, grams and ml. This teaching resource is ideal for mental maths sessions using an interactive whiteboard. It requires knowledge of tables. Ideal for SATs. A IWB teaching resource for helping children to understand fractions of amounts. This resource has attractive sets of images which can be changed to represent different fractions. Intended for oral work.An interactive resource where you can make equivalent fractions using different numbers and try the game to match fractions in different picture patterns to test your knowledge.A useful teaching tool on an interactive whiteboard. This Google Classroom Fractions Worksheet packet will give your students several opportunities to learn and practice fractions. This resource covers a range of 3rd grade Common Core Standards dealing with fractions. These Fraction worksheets are easily able to be done independently by students and a.

Google Classroom resources! Ideal for distance learning!These digital fraction resources are in Google Slides and Google Forms format, making it compatible with Google Classroom. This resource is only intended for digital learning; there is no PDF document included. This bundle includes the followi Try doing some pizza making – have them put different toppings evenly across a pizza. Then encourage them to work out, for example, if they’ve put 10 olives evenly on the pizza and cut the pizza into 5 even pieces, how many olives on each? Chocolate that is marked out in sections is another good edible resource. Ask your child to say how many sections would make up one third of the bar. If they answer correctly, let them eat that fraction. Ask them to find, for example, a quarter of the remaining piece for their friend to eat. (Source: www.theschoolrun.com)

 

 

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