FutureStarr

Find C Calculator

Find C Calculator

Find C Calculator

The Combinations Calculator will find the number of possible combinations that can be obtained by taking a sample of items from a larger set. Basically, it shows how many different possible subsets can be made from the larger set. For this calculator, the order of the items chosen in the subset does not matter.

Calculator

Tick marks on the edge of a triangle are a common notation that reflects the length of the side, where the same number of ticks means equal length. Similar notation exists for the internal angles of a triangle, denoted by differing numbers of concentric arcs located at the triangle's vertices. As can be seen from the triangles above, the length and internal angles of a triangle are directly related, so it makes sense that an equilateral triangle has three equal internal angles, and three equal length sides. Note that the triangle provided in the calculator is not shown to scale; while it looks equilateral (and has angle markings that typically would be read as equal), it is not necessarily equilateral and is simply a representation of a triangle. When actual values are entered, the calculator output will reflect what the shape of the input triangle should look like.

Law of sines: the ratio of the length of a side of a triangle to the sine of its opposite angle is constant. Using the law of sines makes it possible to find unknown angles and sides of a triangle given enough information. Where sides a, b, c, and angles A, B, C are as depicted in the above calculator, the law of sines can be written as shown below. Thus, if b, B and C are known, it is possible to find c by relating b/sin(B) and c/sin(C). Note that there exist cases when a triangle meets certain conditions, where two different triangle configurations are possible given the same set of data. (Source: www.calculator.net)

Use

One learns about the "factor theorem," typically in a second course on algebra, as a way to find all roots that are rational numbers. One also learns how to find roots of all quadratic polynomials, using square roots (arising from the discriminant) when necessary. There are more advanced formulas for expressing roots of cubic and quartic polynomials, and also a number of numeric methods for approximating roots of arbitrary polynomials. These use methods from complex analysis as well as sophisticated numerical algorithms, and indeed, this is an area of ongoing research and development.

Systems of linear equations are often solved using Gaussian elimination or related methods. This too is typically encountered in secondary or college math curricula. More advanced methods are needed to find roots of simultaneous systems of nonlinear equations. Similar remarks hold for working with systems of inequalities: the linear case can be handled using methods covered in linear algebra courses, whereas higher-degree polynomial systems typically require more sophisticated computational tools. (Source: www.wolframalpha.com)

 

Related Articles