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Figure Out How Much Tile I Need

Figure Out How Much Tile I Need

Figure Out How Much Tile I Need

It starts with the roof, and if it’s done right, then you don’t have to do anything else to get a gorgeous, simple, modern tile roof with a sleek, minimal look. Here’s a video that will show you how to figure out how much tile you need. In case you want more information, here are some resources that might help you.

Tile

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A: You’re wise to mull over your tile needs before you go shopping for materials. Whether you’re installing tile on your foyer floor or on your kitchen or bathroom walls, determining how much tile you need is an essential first step. This calculation will help you ensure adequate tile coverage, budget accordingly for the project, and avoid return trips to your local home center. Conveniently, the steps for determining your tile needs are the same regardless of surface, so grab a measuring tape and a calculator and get started! When buying individual tiles, you need to learn the square footage (or fraction of) that each one covers. Tiles sold individually will note the dimensions of the tile in inches on the packaging. Multiply the tile length by the width to figure the area that one tile will cover in square inches. Divide the result by 144 to convert it to square feet. Then, divide the area you’re tiling by the square footage of one tile to determine how many tiles you need. Again, round up to the nearest whole number.

Calculate the overage you'll need. You should never buy just the amount of tile you need since you also need a bit extra for cuts, waste, breaks, and mistakes. Multiply the square footage of the room by 10%, then add this amount to the total square of the room. This is the total amount of square footage you should buy. To continue with the example we started above, .10 x 120 = 12, and 120 + 12 = 122. We'll need 122 square feet of tile.If the space you want to tile is an unusual shape, draw a picture of the floor plan on a piece of paper, then separate the room into squares or rectangles (like I did in the diagrams on this page). Then measure each squared-off section separately, convert inches to feet (divide by 12; you'll probably end up with a decimal), multiply the length and width of each space, then add all these numbers together to find the total square footage. Floor or wall tiles are typically installed with gaps between the tiles because the average tile may look quite similar to the next tile, but they are often not uniform in shape and size, and would not fit properly if installed without any gaps. These gaps are most commonly filled with grout, and as such, are often referred to as grout size, or grout lines. Grout is a form of concrete, and the gap between tiles can range from anywhere between one-sixteenth of an inch to half an inch in size. Different sized tiles, materials, and design needs all affect the size of the gaps. Although it is typically more difficult to have small gaps between tiles due to lack of a uniform shape and size, the use of rectified tiles (tiles that undergo additional processing to ensure that they are uniform) can allow for smaller spacing, though at an additional cost. For more uniformly cut tiles such as granite, smaller grout spacing can result in less visibility of grout lines between each tile. (Source: www.calculator.net)

Tile size can range anywhere from smaller mosaics that are 3/8", to 24" × 48" slab tiles and everything in between. Square sizes (same width and length) are the most popular, accessible, and easiest to install. While straight edge tiles (rectangular, square, parallelogram) are the most common, unique tile shapes also exist, though installation is not as easy. Large tile sizes can make smaller rooms appear bigger, as well as more open and clean because there are fewer grout lines. However, installing larger tiles results in more wastage, while using smaller tiles can help add texture to a room. (Source: www.calculator.net)

 

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