FutureStarr

Do You Later Calculator

Do You Later Calculator

Do You Later Calculator

It’s a bit silly, I suppose, but a calculator that lets you do math as you fall asleep actually exists.

New

via GIPHY

Thank you for contacting us with this issue. If you have paid for ad removal in the past through buying the full version, then the Restore Purchases doesn’t work for you. The reason for that is that the full version is a separate version of the app that you need to download for the App Store. The Restore Purchase is for our new model with subscriptions, but that doesn’t mean your old purchase didn’t remain intact. If this is the case then you can simply download this again from the App Store by searching for ‘Calculator Impala Studios’, or access it through this link: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/the-calculator/id396082453. You won’t be charged for this as the purchase is linked to your Apple ID. We will also make sure to still be updating and testing the full version of the app.

The successor of B3-21, the Elektronika B3-34 wasn't backward compatible with B3-21, even if it kept the reverse Polish notation (RPN). Thus B3-34 defined a new command set, which later was used in a series of later programmable Soviet calculators. Despite very limited abilities (98 bytes of instruction memory and about 19 stack and addressable registers), people managed to write all kinds of programs for them, including adventure games and libraries of calculus-related functions for engineers. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of programs were written for these machines, from practical scientific and business software, which were used in real-life offices and labs, to fun games for children. The Elektronika MK-52 calculator (using the extended B3-34 command set, and featuring internal EEPROM memory for storing programs and external interface for EEPROM cards and other periphery) was used in Soviet spacecraft program (for Soyuz TM-7 flight) as a backup of the board computer. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Use

via GIPHY

In some situations, the months and days result of this age calculator may be confusing, especially when the starting date is the end of a month. For example, we all count Feb. 20 to March 20 to be one month. However, there are two ways to calculate the age from Feb. 28, 2015 to Mar. 31, 2015. If thinking Feb. 28 to Mar. 28 as one month, then the result is one month and 3 days. If thinking both Feb. 28 and Mar. 31 as the end of the month, then the result is one month. Both calculation results are reasonable. Similar situations exist for dates like Apr. 30 to May 31, May 30 to June 30, etc. The confusion comes from the uneven number of days in different months. In our calculation, we used the former method.

You will also notice some differences in how addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division keys appear. Once you bring up the calculator function, there is often a circle or square to give you the operations which you perform using the Menu button on the phone. Always put a number in to start and then you can add, subtract, multiply, or divide. A few phones have other operations available, but usually they are available as a download and are quite expensive compared to purchasing a calculator. (Source: www.universalclass.com)

 

Related Articles