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Desmos Dot Plot

Desmos Dot Plot

Desmos Dot Plot

Desmos Dot Plot is a web-based JavaScript tool for generating complex line and scatterplots. Built for both for the classroom and the boardroom, it offers a unique, interactive way to visualize data.

Data

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One of the books that came across my path during my research was Workshop Statistics: Discovery with Data by Allan J. Rossman and Beth L. Chance. I picked up a copy of the 3rd edition from Amazon for super cheap (~$6 shipped – sadly it looks like used copies are a bit more expensive at the moment), and I was super impressed with the book, the activities, and the data sets. There is a newer, updated 4th edition, but I haven’t splurged on a copy for myself. If teaching statistics becomes a regular thing for me, then I might be able to justify the purchase. The Google Statistics add-on for Google Sheets can display multiple boxplots in a single chart. The key is the layout of the data. One column should be the variable by which the data is to be grouped, the other column should be the data to be box plotted. Set up the Statistics add-on with the data to be plotted as the variable, and the grouping column as the "by" variable. In this image I had deselected all but the boxplot option, the result was the appearance of the Moment, Standard errors, and Confidence intervals options. The default is apparently a 95% confidence interval for the mean. The result is multiple boxplots on a single chart with a common scale. The new tab that is created also quotes 95% confidence intervals for the mean. Note that as of 2018 the Google Statistics add-on cannot be found by search in the add-ons. In addition, as of May 2018 the add-on no longer verifies, possibly due to the add-on not having been updated since August 2017. One may ha

This Desmos activity provides an interactive opportunity for students to work with data as represented between data and the box plot that results from it. Students walk through an investigation on interpreting center, spread, and the impact of outliers on various box plots. Students will also use their inference skills to compare two box plots. The teacher has the ability to pace students on slides, pause them, and promote whole class discussion based upon individual student responses. The teacher can also anonymize students names to provide for more risk taking in their responses.Construct and interpret two-way frequency tables of data when two categories are associated with each object being classified. Use the two-way table as a sample space to decide if events are independent and to approximate conditional probabilities. For example, collect data from a random sample of students in your school on their favorite subject among math, science, and English. Estimate the probability that a randomly selected student from your school will favor science given that the student is in tenth grade. Do the same for other subjects and compare the results. (Source: www.commonsense.org)

Student

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Desmos has produced video introducing these new statistical features. Desmos brings very powerful visualization capabilities including animations to distributions and areas under a distribution curve. My students always had difficulty understanding what the result of a normdist function in a spreadsheet meant, Desmos makes that result very visual. Note that the normal distribution function in Desmos is normaldist, a break from mirroring function names used in spreadsheets. And where spreadsheet functions can only return the area to the left of a value, Desmos can return the area to the left, right, or between two values graphically. And then everything changed. For the first time since the loss of Gnumeric a spreadsheet was displaying a box and whisker plot. To back up to the beginning, MS 150 Statistics was built around spreadsheets. Students in the course were not statistics majors and the overwhelming majority were not in a scientific field. Most would wind up working on office desktops for which they would not be an administrator. Downloading R would not be an option and R would be steep learning curve for some for whom computers are an unfamiliar technology. Spreadsheet based statistics, for all the faults and potential for error, would be at the center of the course. The use of Ubuntu in the classroom meant using LibreOffice.org or Gnumeric . Gnumeric provided the capability of including box and whisker plots. A change in computer laboratory technology to Microsoft Windows five years later saw the use of Gnumeric on Windows - until Gnumeric stopped supporting Windows. A further change of my work top to OS.

This Desmos activity provides an interactive opportunity for students to work with data as represented between data and the box plot that results from it. Students walk through an investigation on interpreting center, spread, and the impact of outliers on various box plots. Students will also use their inference skills to compare two box plots. The teacher has the ability to pace students on slides, pause them, and promote whole class discussion based upon individual student responses. The teacher can also anonymize students names to provide for more risk taking in their responses. Desmos is a free graphing and teaching tool for math available on the web as well as on iOS and Android. In addition to plotting equations, classroom activities are available to help students learn about a variety of math concepts. For example, students can learn how to transform periodic functions by trying to slide marbles through points on a graph. Or they can plug in their own equation and see what kind of graph pops up; sliders allow students to adjust values and see what happens. Users can also click directly on the graph to find the coordinates of points of intersection, maxima, and minima. (Source: www.commonsense.org)

 

 

 

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