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Consumer Arithmetic Calculator

Consumer Arithmetic Calculator

Consumer Arithmetic Calculator

I need to work out what's the total cost of something

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In most of the modules from F–8 we present the material so that the ideas can be understood and the exercises solved without using a calculator. For the work in this module, we assume that the reader has a calculator at hand, and that the answers to computations are rounded in a way that is appropriate in the given context. When presenting problems to school students it is wise for the teacher to specify carefully how they wish their students to round up or down, whether to the nearest dollar, or nearest cent and so on. Note that rounding at multiple stages in a calculation may alter an answer by a small amount. For this reason it is better to only round at the last ste.

Calculator Soup is a free online calculator. Here you will find free loan, mortgage, time value of money, math, algebra, trigonometry, fractions, physics, statistics, time & date and conversions calculators. Many of the calculator pages show work or equations that help you understand the calculations. If you don't find what you need, we are always happy to consider requests for new calculators or additional features and information. Contact us for Calculator Requests and Suggestions. (Source: www.calculatorsoup.com)

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In the first half of the seventh century BC, Pheidon of Argos, on the Greek mainland, is believed to have set up a system of standardized weights and measures, and to have begun the use of stamped coinage. Although this was the first use of coinage in Europe, the earliest known coins stem from Ionia (part of modern day Turkey) and by 650 BC stamped coinage was in relatively common usage in Lydia in Asia Minor from where the concept spread to most parts of Greece and beyond. Coins were typically minted by some official government process with the amount of precious metal being carefully controlled to equal the 'value’ of the coin. In time, the 'authority’ of the government stamp enabled the coin to be devalued in terms of the precious metal it contained, while nevertheless retaining official value. This led to the notion of representative money.

Blaise Pascal in 1642. Later in the 17th century, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz created a more-advanced machine, and, especially in the late 19th century, inventors produced calculating machines that were smaller and smaller and less and less laborious to use. In the early decades of the 20th century, desktop adding machines and other calculating devices were developed. Some were key-driven, others required a rotating drum to enter sums punched into a keyboard, and later the drum was spun by electric motor. (Source: www.britannica.com)

 

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