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Change to Decimal Form

Change to Decimal Form

Change to Decimal Form

As globalization continues, the number of financial transactions in countries worldwide is growing. In a time of increasing recession and financial instability, this exponential rise in transactions can cause issues that can cause panic and chaos when trying to value, balance and trade assets globally. In order to keep up with this global shift, trading finances in the US and other countries must adopt the system of using a decimals rather than the old tradition of using pounds.

Decimal

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A tenth of a percent in decimal form is 0.001. If you have a figure that has more than three numbers after the decimal, you round it by looking at the fourth number (a hundredth of a percent). If that number is five or more, then you round the tenth of a percent up. If the number is four or less, then you round down and keep the tenth of a percent as it is. For example, 0.0015 would become 0.002, but 0.0014 would become 0.

Next, for every number after the decimal point, multiply by 10. Since there are two numbers after the decimal in our example, we multiply 10 twice. If there were four numbers after the decimal, we would multiply 10 four times. The multiplication factor is essential to remember. You’re not “adding” 10 after each decimal point. You’re multiplying. In this case, you’ll multiply 10 times 10, which equals 100. So you’ll multiply the top number and the bottom number by 100. (Source: www.mometrix.com)

Example

via GIPHY

Next, for every number after the decimal point, multiply by 10. Since there are two numbers after the decimal in our example, we multiply 10 twice. If there were four numbers after the decimal, we would multiply 10 four times. The multiplication factor is essential to remember. You’re not “adding” 10 after each decimal point. You’re multiplying. In this case, you’ll multiply 10 times 10, which equals 100. So you’ll multiply the top number and the bottom number by 100.

A tenth of a percent in decimal form is 0.001. If you have a figure that has more than three numbers after the decimal, you round it by looking at the fourth number (a hundredth of a percent). If that number is five or more, then you round the tenth of a percent up. If the number is four or less, then you round down and keep the tenth of a percent as it is. For example, 0.0015 would become 0.002, but 0.0014 would become 0.001. (Source: www.thebalance.com)

 

 

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