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Calculator Backspace Symbol

Calculator Backspace Symbol

Calculator Backspace Symbol

Caps lock is one of those keys I never liked, but I still use. It’s cap lock’s ugly little brother, the backspace, that really fills me with dread. The backspace key changes everything. It’s a time machine. The backspace is for everything that went wrong. It’s for uppercase letters and lowercase letters, computer language and literature, for mistakes and things you don’t mean.

Use

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Pressing the backspace key on a computer terminal would generate the ASCII code 08, BS or Backspace, a control code which would delete the preceding character. That control code could also be accessed by pressing Control-H, as H is the eighth letter of the Latin alphabet. Terminals which did not have the backspace code mapped to the function of moving the cursor backwards and deleting the preceding character would display the symbols ^H (caret, H) when the backspace key was pressed. Even if a terminal did interpret backspace by deleting the preceding character, the system receiving the text might not. Then, the sender's screen would show a message without the supposedly deleted text, while that text, and the deletion codes, would be visible to the recipient. This sequence is still used humorously for epanorthosis by computer literates, denoting the deletion of a pretended blunder, much like a strikethrough; in this case, however, the ^H symbol is faked by typing a regular '^' followed by typing a regular 'H^ There is no reason why a digital display or typesetting system could not be designed to allow backspace composition, a.k.a. overstrike, if an engineer chose to do that. As most contemporary computer display and typesetting systems are raster graphics-based rather than character-based (as of 2012), they make overstrike actually quite easy to implement. However, the use of proportional-width rather than fixed-width (monospaced) fonts makes the practical implementation of overstrike more complicated, and the original physical motivation for the technique is not present in digital computer systems.

(aka caret) is the character on normal keyboard, shifted 6. It is the classic notation to indicate ASCII control character in programing, and also used as a notation for pressing Control key for inputting control sequence. [see ASCII Table] The symbol is mostly used in 1970s to 1990s, in documentation or from online posts by user. (Source: xahlee.info)

Font

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^ There is no reason why a digital display or typesetting system could not be designed to allow backspace composition, a.k.a. overstrike, if an engineer chose to do that. As most contemporary computer display and typesetting systems are raster graphics-based rather than character-based (as of 2012), they make overstrike actually quite easy to implement. However, the use of proportional-width rather than fixed-width (monospaced) fonts makes the practical implementation of overstrike more complicated, and the original physical motivation for the technique is not present in digital computer systems. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

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