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Calculator 1 10

Calculator 1 10

Calculator 1 10

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Use

A ratio is a quantitative relationship between two numbers that describe how many times one value can contain another. Applications of ratios are fairly ubiquitous, and the concept of ratios is quite intuitive. This could likely be demonstrated by giving a child half as many cookies as his sister. While the child may not be able to voice the injustice using ratios, the raucous protestations that would most likely ensue should make it immediately obvious that he is well aware he has received 1:2 as many cookies as his sister, conceptually, if not mathematically.

Ratios are common in many daily applications including: aspect ratios for screens, describing maps and models as a scaled-down version of their actual size, in baking and cooking, when discussing the odds of something occurring, or to describe rates, such as in finance. If, for example, a person wanted to make 5 cakes, each of which required a 1:2:3 ratio of butter:sugar:flour, and wanted to determine the total amount of butter, sugar, and flour that is necessary, it would be simple to compute given the ratio. Increasing the ratio by five times yields a 5:10:15 ratio, and this can be multiplied by whatever the actual amount of sugar, flour, and butter are used in the actual cake recipe. (Source: www.calculator.net)

Divide

Do you have problems with simplifying fractions? The best way to solve this is by finding the GCF (Greatest Common Factor) of the numerator and denominator and divide both of them by GCF. You might find our GCF and LCM calculator to be convenient here. It searches all the factors of both numbers and then shows the greatest common one. As the name suggests, it also estimates the LCM which stands for the Least Common Multiple.

www.omnicalculator.com)Although Ancient Romans used Roman numerals I, V, X, L, and so on, calculations were often performed in fractions that were divided by 100. It was equivalent to the computing of percentages that we know today. Computations with a denominator of 100 became more standard after the introduction of the decimal system. Many medieval arithmetic texts applied this method to describe finances, e.g., interest rates. However, the percent sign % we know today only became popular a little while ago, in the 20th century, after years of constant evolution. (Source:

 

 

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